More Links in News & Events
Share

Peace Stories: Real Lives, Real Change

The Carter Center’s peace programs strengthen freedom and democracy in nations worldwide, securing for people the political and civil rights that are the foundation of just and peaceful societies. Follow the links below to hear some of their stories.

U.S. Election: Election Bites 2022

Grab your lunch and join us for 10-minute interviews with election experts on some of the most pressing U.S. election issues. Learn more »

Blog | Respect Bridges Differences During Protest

By Johnny Ndebe, a national dispute resolution monitor for The Carter Center in Liberia

Last year, I was notified that a crowd of protesters had blockaded a bridge a few hours from Monrovia, Liberia, where I work as the national dispute monitor with The Carter Center. Learn more »

Center Sends Expert Group to Venezuelan Elections

Municipal and regional elections don’t usually attract much interest outside the country where they’re taking place, but when Venezuelans went to the polls last November to choose their next governors and mayors, the world was paying close attention. Learn more »

Blog | Strong Partnerships Can Change the World

By Nicole Kruse, Interim Vice President of Development

A family reunion of sorts took place last month in Williamsburg, Virginia. It was the annual Carter Center Weekend, when a limited number of friends and supporters gather to catch up with each other, hear from Center leadership and staff, and take part in various fun activities, including silent and live auctions. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Pursues Mali Peace Agreement Action

By Jason Carter, chair of the Carter Center Board of Trustees

Jason Carter met with Col. Assimi Goïta to discuss actions taken toward the Mali Peace Agreement created in 2015 and eradication efforts of Guinea worm disease. Learn more »

Blog | The Carter Center’s Long Standing History of Waging Peace in War-Torn Nations

By Paige Alexander, chief executive officer of The Carter Center

We at The Carter Center are horrified by the devastation in Ukraine. As we have helped other nations to rebuild after wars, we will continue waging peace. Learn more »

Blog | Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine Complicates the Situation in Syria

Analysis by Hari Prasad, Program Associate, Conflict Resolution Program

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 has had obvious effects on Ukraine and Eastern Europe, but its current and potential destabilizing effects in Syria are not receiving the attention they desperately need. Learn more »

Vice President Ready to Keep the Peace

Barbara Smith, vice president of the Carter Center’s peace programs, says she was born to her line of work. Her mother is from Germany and taught her the value of international perspectives. Her father was in the military and ingrained in her the importance of service. Learn more »

Blog | New Report Spotlights Dangerous Unexploded Weapons in Syria

By Hampton Stall, Senior Program Associate, The Carter Center

After the Mozambique civil war ended in 1992, demining experts needed 23 years to clear the 86,000 unexploded weapons left behind. A just-released Carter Center report suggests that there could be more than three times that amount of unexploded ordnance in Syria, where demining efforts have yet to begin. Learn more »

Blog | Disinformation, Propaganda, and the War in Ukraine

By Sarah E. Morris, head of instruction and engagement at the Emory University Libraries

The war in Ukraine is a terrible situation that is keeping many of us glued to our devices, looking for updates and ways to help Ukraine. Unfortunately, large amounts of misinformation, disinformation, and propaganda are swirling around, creating confusion and disruption. Learn more »

Blog | Russia-Ukraine Conflict Exposes Need for Digital Geneva Convention

Russia has long treated Ukraine as a proving ground for testing its novel and destructive cyberweapons. In 2015, Russia launched a cyberattack on the power grid in Ukraine, plunging 230,000 civilians into darkness and cutting off power to homes, hospitals, and schools in the dead of winter. Repairs took months to complete. Two years later, Russia launched another attack that crippled government, financial, and energy institutions, shut down nuclear safety monitoring systems, and permanently erased public and private data. The attack spilled over Ukraine’s borders, disrupting private-sector entities such as Maersk, FedEx, and Merck and costing an estimated $10 billion. Learn more »

Center Analyzes Misleading Content on Facebook

Fact checkers have a term for media sources that repeatedly share false or misleading content: misinformation repeat offenders. The Carter Center’s Digital Threats team studied the prevalence of misinformation repeat offenders in right- and left-leaning Facebook groups during the 2020 U.S. election cycle and published its findings in October in a report titled, "The Big Lie and Big Tech." Learn more »

Human Rights Sessions Focus on U.S. Social Justice

Josh Griffin, a young consultant in the Carter Center’s Human Rights Program, participated in the 2020 March on Washington for racial justice in the wake of the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Standing at the foot of the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, Griffin heard inspiring words from several speakers, including the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s son Martin III and 12-year-old granddaughter Yolanda Renee King. Learn more »

Center Fights Digital Threats to Democracy, Human Rights

Two and a half years ago, recognizing that things that take place in the online world were increasingly having real-world consequences, The Carter Center launched the Digital Threats to Democracy Project. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Our Practices Change; Our Principles Don’t

By Paige Alexander, chief executive officer of The Carter Center

President Carter frequently reminds us of his high school teacher’s words of wisdom: “We must adjust to changing times and still hold to unchanging principles.” At The Carter Center, we practice this precept by holding fast to our founding commitments to defend human rights and relieve human suffering while continually seeking new and improved ways to accomplish our humanitarian goals. Learn more »

Strengthening Young People’s Role in Sudan’s Democratic Future

On Oct. 25, 12 days after this story was published, members of Sudan’s military seized control of the government. The Carter Center issued a statement condemning the coup and is now monitoring developments there. It remains committed to supporting the people of Sudan. Learn more »

Roundtables Put Human Rights Front and Center

Josh Griffin, a graduate assistant with the Carter Center’s Human Rights Program, participated in the 2020 March on Washington for racial justice in the wake of the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Standing at the foot of the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, Griffin heard inspiring words from several speakers, including the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s son Martin III and 12-year-old granddaughter Yolanda Renee King. Learn more »

Blog | The Past, Present, and Future of U.S.-China Relations: A Bush China Foundation Conversation with President Jimmy Carter

This interview with President Carter was conducted in Spring 2020 and originally published in the Bush China Foundation’s 2019/2020 Annual Report. Learn more »

Blog | Peace and Health Go Hand in Hand. We Must Pursue Both.

By Dr. Kashef Ijaz, vice president, health programs, and Barbara J. Smith, vice president, peace programs

Back in the turbulent 1960s, there was a popular poster — today it would be a meme on social media — that said, "War is not healthy for children and other living things." Learn more »

U.S. Election: Election Bites

Grab your lunch and join us for 10-minute interviews with election experts on some of the most pressing U.S. election issues. Learn more »

CEO Takes Center’s Reins Amid Pandemic, Turmoil

When new CEO Paige Alexander first saw the cafeteria in the Carter Center’s Atlanta office, paper shamrocks and pots of gold adorned the walls to mark St. Patrick’s Day. Only it wasn’t March. It was June 2020. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Coronavirus Can’t Compete With the Carter Center’s Commitment

By Paige Alexander, chief executive officer

When new CEO Paige Alexander first saw the cafeteria in the Carter Center’s Atlanta office, paper shamrocks and pots of gold adorned the walls to mark St. Patrick’s Day. Only it wasn’t March. It was June 2020. Learn more »

Center Observes Record-Breaking Georgia Audit

In November, the state of Georgia undertook the largest hand tally of election ballots ever performed in the United States. And The Carter Center had a front-row seat. Learn more »

2020 Election: Center Tackles Transparency, Political Violence

The 2020 U.S. election was like none before it. Polarization was at an all-time high, with many on both sides mistrusting each other and the process itself. The pandemic introduced further complications, challenging election officials to find ways to ensure accessibility while keeping voters safe. Because of this, The Carter Center chose to do something it had never done before—get involved in a U.S. election. Learn more »

Carter-Baker Panel Discussions Focus on Bipartisan Solutions to Election Reform

In 2005, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former Secretary of State James A. Baker III joined forces to chair the bipartisan Commission on Federal Election Reform. Learn more »

Determined Student Finds Route to College

Marthaline Nuah is determined to get a college education. There is no university in her village in northeastern Liberia, so she left home and moved in with an aunt who lives in Saniquellie, which is the capital of Nimba County and home to a community college. Her aunt gave her the money to pay for college entrance exams, which she passed, and for the college’s admission fees. But there wasn’t enough left over for courses. Learn more »

Blog | Inform Women, Transform Lives Q and A with Laura Neuman

By Laura Neuman, director, Rule of Law Program

Laura Neuman, director of the Carter Center’s Rule of Law Program and leader of the team that developed the Inform Women, Transform Lives campaign, discusses what it’s all about and why it matters. Learn more »

New App Helps Liberians Report Good and Bad Police Behavior

Liberians now have a new, easy way to file complaints – or compliments – about police officers. With support from The Carter Center, a Liberian company has developed the Find Officer app, part of a larger effort to build trust in the police by increasing accountability. Learn more »

Center Monitors Fall Elections in Three Countries

The United States was not the only country in the midst of election season this fall; many countries around the world held or will soon hold elections, and The Carter Center worked on three of them. Learn more »

Blog | Youth Key in Sudan's Shift to Democracy

By Ben Spears, senior program associate, Conflict Resolution Program

This is an exciting time in Sudan. After 30 years, a period marked by civil war in Darfur and other areas of the country, Omar al-Bashir was forced from power in a revolution led largely by young women and men. Now Sudan is working out a new identity as it transitions to peace and democracy, and young people can lead the way. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Center Makes Most of New Normal

By Paige Alexander, chief executive officer, The Carter Center

I don’t need to tell you what a strange and challenging year 2020 has been. A pandemic has forced us to avoid close human interactions, but The Carter Center has been fortunate and is taking advantage of the opportunities that technology brings to keep moving forward with our mission to wage peace, fight disease, and build hope. Learn more »

Blog | Q&A: David Carroll, Director of the Democracy Program at The Carter Center

By David Carroll, director, Democracy Program

Engaging in the U.S. is more complicated than in other countries because we don’t have a centralized election administration – we have a patchwork of about 10,000 jurisdictions across 50 states. (That, by the way, is one of several areas in which the U.S. falls short of international election standards.) Learn more »

Blog | Center Aims to Mitigate Possible Election Violence in Some Communities

The Carter Center is partnering with Cure Violence Global and Princeton University’s Bridging Divides Initiative on a project to mitigate violence that could erupt in some U.S. communities in the days before and after the November election. Learn more »

Using Conflict Data to Help Demining Efforts in Syria

Even as conflict in many areas of Syria subsides, dangers still remain – including abandoned or unexploded weapons that could kill or maim unsuspecting civilians as they try to rebuild their lives. Learn more »

Blocked from the Booth: Many Native Americans Have Difficulty Voting

When North Dakota Democrats held their caucus in March, residents of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation – which stretches over six counties and nearly a million acres – had just one designated spot to drop off ballots. Learn more »

Promoting Peace in Mali

When the Carter Center team arrived in the northern Mali town of Gao one warm, blustery afternoon in February, tensions were running high. Two days earlier, a high-ranking general had been assassinated while tending his animals just outside of town. The killing cast a pall over a major achievement that took place earlier that morning: the deployment of the first 240 soldiers in the newly reconstituted Malian army, made up of combatants from three different elements that fought against each other during Mali’s civil war. Learn more »

Using Art to Halt the Spread of Coronavirus in DRC

In the Democratic Republic of Congo, young artists with ties to The Carter Center are giving their time and talent to create paintings and songs that encourage people in their communities to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Learn more »

Analyzing Shifts in Territorial Control within Syria Offers Glimpse of Future Challenges

Nine years have passed since the conflict in Syria began. In recent months, as opposition strongholds have fallen and frontlines have shifted, the map of territorial control suggests that the conflict is entering its endgame. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Staying Positive, Building Hope

By Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer

At this time of great challenges brought by the COVID-19 pandemic, I have been deeply moved by the commitment of our Carter Center staff to our mission to help the world’s poorest people. Indeed, our aim to wage peace, fight disease, and build hope has never been more urgent than it is today. Learn more »

Protecting Human Rights During the Pandemic

Even as governments across the globe rush to protect their citizens from the deadly effects of COVID-19, some are using the coronavirus as an excuse to violate human rights laws and expand their powers. Learn more »

A High-Stakes Election in Guyana

On March 2, citizens of Guyana went to the polls for what the country was calling “the mother of all elections.” Every election is important, of course, but this one was deemed especially so because five years ago, Exxon discovered massive amounts of oil off the coast of Guyana. The first barrels hit the market in January. Now this small, poor nation is poised to become a very rich one. And the country’s two major political parties – which are divided largely along ethnic lines – desperately want to control the coming wealth. Learn more »

'There is a Demand for Human Rights'

Thirteen years ago, The Carter Center opened the Human Rights House in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo. It is home to a small team of staffers who perform a large amount of work – providing training and assistance to more than 100 local civil society organizations working on issues related to human rights, supporting a protection network that helps keep human rights defenders safe, and overseeing a variety of projects designed to spark youth engagement in democracy and human rights. Learn more »

Blog | Courtyard Meetings Help with Benefits

By Laura Neuman, director, Rule of Law Program

Selima Begum, 28, is the mother of a 7-year-old boy with cerebral palsy. They live in Tuker Bazar Union, Sylhet Division, Bangladesh. Since her divorce, Begum has struggled to provide necessary medical care for her son, at times having to forgo routine medical treatments because of a lack of money. Though she works as a housecleaner when she can, it often does not pay enough to meet all her family’s needs. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Innovation Embedded in Center's Activities

By Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer

In 1982, President and Mrs. Carter created a new kind of post-presidential institution, not a think tank, but an organization acting to alleviate suffering and advance human rights for the world’s poorest people. Ever since, innovation has been part of the Center’s DNA. Learn more »

Human Rights Defenders: In Their Own Words

Human rights activists and scholars from 28 countries gathered at The Carter Center recently for the 12th Human Rights Defenders Forum. This year’s theme was “Building Solidarity toward Equality for All,” and topics included global protection for activists, challenges for women defenders and peacemakers, and the importance of mutually supporting civil, economic, political, and social rights. Defenders talked about their struggles and frustrations but also offered words of wisdom and hope. Learn more »

Malian Mothers Want Peace So They Can See Their Children

Aisha Ahmed and Safi Inorano go about their daily tasks with holes in their hearts. While they work as cleaners on the U.N. base in Kidal, Mali, their daughters live with relatives hundreds of miles away in cities that – unlike their own – have functioning schools. Learn more »

Blog | A Conversation with the Carters (Sept. 17, 2019) Webcast Archive

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter discuss how the Center wages peace and fights disease to build hope for millions around the world. They also take questions from the audience. Learn more »

‘We Don’t Want War’

Leaders and everyday citizens in central Mali seek solutions to tribal and political conflict that has disrupted their lives. Learn more »

Under the Malian Sun: The Carter Center Observes the Implementation of a Peace Agreement in Mali

One bright morning in mid-June, a U.N. convoy rolls through the small, dusty town of Kidal in Mali’s northern desert. The temperature is already well on its way to a high of 114, and few people are on the street to witness a Carter Center staffer in a blue flak jacket and helmet clamber out of the back of an armored personnel carrier (what a civilian might call a tank) into the brutal heat. Learn more »

Route to Disability Allowance a Mystery No More

Selima Begum, 28, is the mother of a 7-year-old boy with cerebral palsy. They live in Tuker Bazar Union, Sylhet Division, Bangladesh. Since her divorce, Selima has struggled to provide necessary medical care for her son, at times having to forgo routine medical treatments because of a lack of money. Though she works as a housecleaner when she can, it often does not pay enough to meet all her family’s needs. Learn more »

Blog | Four Years After Peace Accord, What Has Really Changed?

By John Goodman, associate director in the Conflict Resolution Program

The Carter Center's John Goodman, associate director in the Conflict Resolution Program, spoke recently to Al Jazeera's Nicolas Haque in Bamako, Mali, about ongoing violence and instability in Mali and how the people there have seen few, if any, dividends from the peace agreement signed four years ago. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Communication Cultivates Grassroots Impact

By Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer

The Carter Center operates dozens of initiatives addressing a range of challenging peace and health issues. Some of them seek to end human rights abuses and promote sustainable peace, while others help improve the health of at-risk people in remote places. Learn more »

Blog | Q&A: ISIS Down, But Not Out, in Syria

Just a few years ago, ISIS controlled giant swaths of Syria – its combined lands totaled more than 34,000 square miles, just a little less than you’ll find in the state of Indiana. Today, it has lost all that territory. But that doesn’t mean it is no longer a threat to the people of Syria. Individuals and groups with ties to ISIS continue to carry out attacks, even as the nature and number of those attacks change. Learn more »

Bolstering Human Rights in Mexico

In the spring of 2019, staff members in the Carter Center’s Latin America and Caribbean Program traveled to Mérida, capital of Mexico’s Yucatán state, to present a report about Mexico’s human rights system. Learn more »

Director Sees Security, Civil Rights as Integral Partners

Laura Olson jumped at the chance to work at The Carter Center because of the opportunity to work directly with communities in other countries. “What spoke to me was that The Carter Center really listens to people. We are there to facilitate the changes they want to see and not to tell them what they should do. I also like that we help build local capacity so that communities can independently accomplish their goals.” Learn more »

Blog | Preparing for March 31 Myanmar Elections

The Carter Center, with the support of UK Aid, helped prepare a range of voter education materials for the March 31 municipal elections in Yangon, Myanmar. A coalition of 10 civil society organizations, coordinated by our partner New Myanmar Foundation, is using the materials in its street campaign. These are Yangon’s first elections with universal suffrage, so many women and youth will be voting for the first time. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Helping Us Move Ahead in Difficult Times

By Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer

The Center’s work is never easy, even in the best of times, when the world seems eager to embrace the efforts you help make possible in seeking peace, health, and hope for people in need. Learn more »

Breaking Down Barriers to Native American Voting

Their ancestors were the first to live on the land that came to be known as America, and yet many still have trouble exercising the most basic of American rights – the right to vote. Native Americans face a variety of barriers on their way to the polls, some of which seem almost unbelievable in 2019. Learn more »

A Momentous Occasion: Academic Papers Written to Commemorate President Carter’s 1979 Decision to Normalize Relations with China

The Carter Center's China Program looks back at President Carter’s 1979 decision to normalize relations with China, and is publishing academic papers to commemorate the anniversary. Learn more »

Human Rights Defenders Share Unique Perspectives

In July, The Carter Center brought together nearly 70 activists, peacemak­ers, and religious and community leaders from 36 countries for the annual Human Rights Defenders Forum. Learn more »

A Momentous Occasion: A Look Back at President Carter’s 1979 Decision to Normalize Relations with China

The Carter Center is commemorating the 40th anniversary of normalizing diplomatic relations with China with a symposium on Jan. 17-19 that will feature dozens of experts on U.S.-China relations. You can read more about this diplomatic feat on this page, which features a Q&A with President Carter, a timeline of key moments in the China Program, and a President Carter-penned op-ed on the future of U.S.-Sino relations that recently ran in The Washington Post. Learn more »

The Carter Center in China

Key moments in the Center’s decades-long relationship with the People’s Republic of China. Learn more »

40 Years of Friendship

From the personal to the political, President Carter reflects on our nation’s – and his own – relationship with China. Excerpt from the Shanghai Institute of American Studies' "Forty People, Forty Years" series commemorating the 40th anniversary of diplomatic normalization between the United States and China. Learn more »

Blog | Harmonizing Religion and Human Rights Webcast Archive

If you missed the Carter Center's original webcast of "Harmonizing Religion and Human Rights," an archive version of the panel discussion can be watched below. Learn more »

Waging Peace Around the World

Building a peaceful world involves more than ending war. A peaceful world is one in which justice thrives, everyone’s rights are respected, and people have access to essentials. The Carter Center has dozens of programs and projects dedicated to making the dream of peace a reality. This slide show explores a handful of them. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Everyday People Can Do Exceptional Things

By Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer

At The Carter Center, we believe people can improve their own lives when they have the right skills, knowledge, and access to resources. I’d like to introduce you to a few people who are making a real difference in their communities. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Human Rights: How Can We Help the Victims of Boko Haram?

Reverend Esther Ibanga is the senior pastor of Jos Christian Missions International and the president and founder of Women Without Walls Initiative (WOWWI), an organization established to address the persistent ethno–religious conflicts in Plateau state. Under her leadership, WOWWI has provided a platform for women across different ethnic and religious groups to activate their voices in the call for peace. Learn more »

Blog | A Conversation with the Carters 2018 Webcast Archive

In case you missed “A Conversation with the Carters” on Sept. 11 at The Carter Center, an archived version of the webcast can be viewed below. Learn more »

Transforming Lives with Information: Video Close-ups on Guatemala

Information has the power to transform lives. But only if you can access it. In 2014, the Carter Center’s Global Access to Information program conducted a study that found that women in Guatemala have a harder time than men accessing information to which they’re entitled. This includes information about things that could make enormous differences in their lives – information about government benefit programs, about laws that protect them, about business and educational opportunities. Learn more »

Blog | Human Rights Defender: Women are Essential to Peace

Meet Penda Mbaye, program manager for Tostan in Senegal, where the international nonprofit works to empower women and girls and create positive social change. As an attendee of the Carter Center’s Human Rights Defenders Forum, Mbaye shared her expertise in human rights education and community outreach. Learn more »

Theodosia Borbor: A Passion for Justice

Theodosia Borbor may not be a lawyer, but she knows Liberian law. And she’s passionate about making sure others do, too. Borbor is a community justice advisor with the Carter Center-supported Catholic Justice and Peace Commission. She provides free mediation services and organizes community awareness sessions for the people of Margibi County, which sits about an hour from Liberia’s capital, Monrovia. Learn more »

Tunisian Professor Empowers Youth to Protect Them

Mongia Nefzi Souahi, a professor at Zitouna University in Tunisia, knows what draws young people to violent extremism. She spent much of the past year trying to insulate 100 at-risk young people in the town of Kasserine – which CNN has called “the Tunisian town where ISIS makes militants” – from the lure of jihadis. Learn more »

Meet a Woman Who Knows her ‘Potential’

The 40-year-old mother of four is the first female driver for the Carter Center’s Access to Justice Project in Liberia – and one of the country’s few female professional drivers, period. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Small Victories Add Up

By Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer

It’s no secret that this world is full of problems—some big and terrifying, some small and trivial. It may seem overwhelming at times, but it doesn’t have to be paralyzing. Learn more »

A Grassroots Approach: Training Community Leaders to Prevent Violent Extremism

In 2014, The Carter Center launched what is now called the Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Extremism Project. Staff first conducted an in-depth analysis of Daesh’s recruitment propaganda and then began training religious and community leaders to develop messaging to counteract extremist propaganda in all forms, whether it comes from Daesh or Islamophobic hate groups. Learn more »

Turning Information into Income

Sometimes, something as simple as a radio message can change lives. Olivia Stewart, a resident of New Georgia Estate, a mostly low-income community on the outskirts of Liberia’s capital city of Monrovia, was washing up one afternoon in 2015 when she heard a public notice for government grants for projects empowering women and youth. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Looks at Women, Elections, and Violence

Last year, a Liberian woman named Beatrix decided she wanted to run for a seat in Liberia’s House of Representatives. But when she told her husband of her plan, he told her that she couldn’t, because she was a woman. Learn more »

Blog | Inform Women, Transform Lives

By Laura Neuman, director, Carter Center Global Access to Information Program

Access to information is a transformative human right. Enshrined in Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, access to information is foundational not just for the exercise of other rights, but also for economic empowerment and meaningful participation in public life. And yet, a large portion of the world’s population is unable to enjoy this right. Learn more »

‘When You Empower a Woman, You Empower the Whole World’

In Kenya in the early years of this century, young men in Nairobi’s Mathare slum were dying one by one at the hands of police and security officers. Sometimes it happened out of sight in custody, sometimes in broad daylight in the street. Other youths simply disappeared, their fates never determined. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Word Search Challenge!

Play our puzzle! Find peace, health, and hope words in the Carter Center’s Word Search below. Learn more »

Democracy Takes a Step Forward in Liberia

The year 2017 was a historic one for Liberia. “For the first time in most of their lives, Liberians saw power transfer from one democratically elected president to another,” said Jordan Ryan, vice president of the Carter Center’s peace programs. “This is something that hasn’t happened in Liberia since the 1940s. Other presidents were forced from power, died in office, or murdered in coups. Learn more »

Carter Center Observes Contentious Kenya Election

On Aug. 8, the Kenyan people stood for hours in long lines to cast their votes in presidential, parliamentary, and local races. Despite their patience and determination, the underlying mood was tense. Learn more »

Liberia Women: Peace Must Prevail

Every day in the weeks leading up to Liberia’s Oct. 10 election, scores of women wearing white t-shirts and blue-and-white skirts gathered in an open-air tent set up in a field in the capital city of Monrovia. Learn more »

Blog | A Unique Collaboration

The Carter Center and Emory University celebrate an amazing 35-year partnership in 2017, a rare and productive union between a nongovernmental organization and a leading institution of higher education. Together, our reach has improved the lives of millions of the world's poorest people through disease prevention, conflict resolution, and the strengthening of human rights and democracy. Learn more »

Blog | DRC Human Rights House Mural Beckons Youth to Get Involved

By Jason Kibiswa Bulambo, technical trainer

The Human Rights House operates three neighborhood Youth Houses, or Maisons des Jeunes — two in Kinshasa and one in Goma — where we work to encourage the positive and constructive participation of youth in public affairs. We provide a free space for debate, which encourages the free exchange of ideas on participatory democracy. Learn more »

The Brickmaker’s Tale: How a $30 Debt Almost Cost a Man his Freedom

Walking home from his office in Kakata, Liberia, Victor Tuazama stumbled upon a confrontation between a police officer and a citizen. When it became clear that the citizen was about to be arrested because he owed a man the equivalent of about US$30, Tuazama, who works as a community justice advisor for the Carter Center-supported Catholic Justice and Peace Commission, intervened. Learn more »

Blog | Pathways to Peace: Prevention

By Jordan Ryan, vice president, peace programs

Over the course of six recent posts, I shared some of the approaches to waging peace that that The Carter Center and its founder, former President Jimmy Carter, have developed or learned over many years. Learn more »

Epidemiologist’s Survey Work Results in Better Interventions

Tigist Astale, an epidemiologist for The Carter Center in Ethiopia, has faced down angry dogs, runaway cattle, and crocodile-filled rivers. She supervises extensive field work in far-flung locations all over the Amhara region of Ethiopia, a region with a considerable burden of trachoma. Because of her commitment to gathering quality data, the trachoma control program continues to implement effective interventions to help reduce blindness in Amhara. Learn more »

Blog | Center Works to Understand and Counter the Rise of Islamophobia

By Houda Abadi, associate director, Conflict Resolution Program

Hate crimes in the U.S. against Muslims or people who look as if they may be Muslim are at an all-time high. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, from 2015 to 2016 the number of anti-Muslim hate groups in the U.S. grew 197 percent and anti-Muslim hate crimes surged 67 percent. From January to July 2017, there were 63 attacks on mosques. Learn more »

Blog | Pathways to Peace: The Sixth Principle

By Jordan Ryan, vice president, peace programs

The Carter Center’s motto is “Waging Peace, Fighting Disease, Building Hope.” In these times, the task for peacemakers is urgent. Learn more »

Ousted Afghan Judge Fights Extremism with Empathy, Respect

Before the Taliban, before the war, before women were banned from positions of power, Najla Ayubi was a judge in Afghanistan. Extremists forced her out of her courtroom and eventually out of her country. Learn more »

Request for Information Leads to ID Card, Pension

For nearly three years, 83-year-old Blanca Nieves Valdez didn’t exist. She was living in a cozy house in the small town of San José la Arada, Guatemala, doing all the things that real people do —eating, sleeping, chatting, chores — but as far as the government of Guatemala was concerned, she was a non-person. The official record book containing her information was destroyed, so when the government changed its ID system, it didn’t issue her a new ID card. Learn more »

Blog | Pathways to Peace: The Fifth Principle

By Jordan Ryan, vice president, peace programs

The task for peacemakers today is urgent. Learn more »

Hope in Hard Times

Abeer Pamuk had just started her sophomore year at the University of Aleppo when the Syrian civil war erupted. She was studying English literature and dreaming of a career as a humanitarian worker in South Sudan. But when the Al-Nusra Front terrorist group occupied the street behind her house, her plans were derailed. Learn more »

Carter Center Prepares to Observe High-Stakes Kenyan Election

When Kenyans go to the polls Aug. 8 to choose their next president, election observers expect tensions to be running high. The race is a virtual repeat of the 2013 contest, again pitting challenger Raila Odinga against Uhuru Kenyatta, who won the last round by the narrowest of margins. Learn more »

Blog | Pathways to Peace: The Fourth Principle

By Jordan Ryan, vice president, peace programs

In these times, the task for peacemakers is urgent. Learn more »

Blog | Native American Voters Face Unique Obstacles

By Tye Tavaras

Until 1924’s Indian Citizenship Act, American Indians did not have the legal right to vote. Learn more »

Blog | Pathways to Peace: Patience and Persistence Pay Off

By Jordan Ryan, vice president, peace programs

The Carter Center’s motto is “Waging Peace, Fighting Disease, Building Hope.” In today’s world, the task for peacemakers is urgent. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow | Love + Solidarity > Fear

Human rights defenders from around the world met at The Carter Center in May 2017 to teach, learn from, network with, and encourage one another under the theme Freedom from Fear: Securing Rights in Challenging Times. At the closing session of the forum, they issued a unified statement, excerpts of which accompany the following images. Learn more »

Latin America Work Creates Unforgettable Experiences

Jennie Lincoln’s career in the Carter Center’s Latin America and Caribbean Program has allowed her to be part of some incredible moments. Learn more »

Blog | Center Initiative Studies How Daesh Exploits Children

The Carter Center’s Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Extremism initiative has issued a paper that analyzes how the Islamic extremist group targets children in its recruitment materials and uses them in its operations. Learn more »

Blog | Waging Peace in Turbulent Times Webcast Archive

In case you missed “Waging Peace in Turbulent Times” on April 13, 2017, an archived webcast of this event can be viewed below. Learn more »

Blog | Pathways to Peace: The Second Principle

By Jordan Ryan, vice president, peace programs

In today’s world, the task for peacemakers is urgent. Learn more »

Eddoes and Empowerment: Women Work to Build Better Life

In Liberia’s Nimba County, many women are raising their children on their own. Fathers often contribute little or nothing to their care, even if the mothers take them to court. Judges may side with the women and order the men to pay child support, but too often the men make a payment or two and then slip off to some other part of the country, never to be heard from again. Learn more »

Blog | Pathways to Peace: The First Principle

By Jordan Ryan, vice president, peace programs

In this time of extreme polarization, when violence seems to be the “new normal,” we face a threat of escalating conflict at home and abroad. The task for peacemakers is urgent. Learn more »

Huda Shafig: Pursuing Peace

Going to university changed Huda Shafig. Until then, she said, she had “kind of lived in a bubble,” mostly unaware of the impact of the conflict raging in parts of Sudan outside of her hometown of Khartoum. Learn more »

Blog | We Accomplish Much by Working Together

By Jimmy Carter, co-founder, The Carter Center

After leaving the White House, Rosalynn and I searched our hearts for ways to use our unique position to help those less fortunate around the world. We knew that two issues were of paramount importance: advancing peace and preventing human suffering. Learn more »

A Step Toward Peace in Sudan: Carter Center Brings Together International Conflict Resolution Experts and Key Sudanese Stakeholders

In the mid-1990s, Monica McWilliams spent two years at negotiating tables sitting next to the leader of an armed group that had tortured and killed her best friend during the Northern Ireland conflict known as The Troubles. Learn more »

Blog | Despite Plebiscite Defeat, Democracy Lives On

By Jake Turner, intern, Latin America and Caribbean Program

As an intern in the Latin America and Caribbean Program, I had the opportunity to be part of Colombia’s domestic election observation to witness Colombians voting abroad on Oct. 2 in a plebiscite to approve the peace accord between the government and the Marxist rebel group FARC.  Our assignment was to observe the vote at the consulate in Atlanta. Learn more »

Blog | China Teen Hand Delivers Donation

One afternoon last summer, a 14-year-old boy from China turned up at The Carter Center bearing a check for $451. Leo Hu and his schoolmates in Xi-an raised the money by charging admission to a play they wrote about Syrian refugees, and he flew all the way to across the Pacific to deliver it in person. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow | Voices for Peace

In 2016, The Carter Center convened dozens of human rights defenders from around the world to explore how to avoid violence while advocating for change. We asked several defenders to explain what human rights means to them. Learn more »

Blog | Observing U.S. Elections Webcast Archive

In case you missed “Observing U.S. Elections” on Oct. 13, 2016, an archived webcast of this event can be viewed below. Learn more »

Carter Center Preps Ohio Women for Election Observation

Members of the League of Women Voters of Ohio learn about election observation from Carter Center staff. Learn more »

Blog | Observing U.S. Elections: Q&A with Democracy Program Experts David Carroll & Avery Davis-Roberts

In advance of the U.S. presidential election of 2016, which will take place on Nov. 8, Davis-Roberts and Carroll answered questions on election observation in the United States. Learn more »

Blog | Americas Program Book Maps Human Rights Network in Colombia

On Sept. 15, members of the Center’s Americas Program traveled to Bogotá, Colombia, for the launch of Trayectoria Institucional de los DDH en Colombia: Retos para Tiempos de Paz, a new publication produced by The Carter Center. Learn more »

Blog | A Conversation with the Carters Webcast Archive

In case you missed “A Conversation with the Carters” on Sept. 13, 2016, an archived webcast of this event can be viewed below. Learn more »

Blog | Finding the End of a 50-Year Civil War: Q&A with Carter Center Expert Jennie Lincoln

For more than 50 years, Colombia has been plagued by civil war. The fighting forced more than 5 million people from their homes and claimed the lives of more than 200,000, according to most reports. But finally, after four years of negotiations, peace is at hand. The Carter Center has been working behind the scenes in Colombia to help prepare for life after war. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Channeling Youthful Energy in DRC

As the Democratic Republic of Congo edges toward its next national election — slated for November, though the timing is in question — one thing is clear: The nation’s young people will play an important role. Learn more »

Blog | War of Words: Helping Muslim Leaders Fight Terrorist Propaganda

Every year, thousands of people leave their home countries and travel to Syria or Iraq to join Daesh, also known as ISIS. Why? What compels these people — most of them young, most of them men — to leave their families and the relative comforts of their homes to fight and die in places where they have no ties? How can we stop others from following in their footsteps? Learn more »

Blog | Keeping the Peace: Carter Center Helps Liberia’s Chiefs Prepare for Bigger Role in National Security

This month, the United Nations turned over the responsibility for Liberia’s security to the Liberian government. It’s the first time in 13 years that the government has been solely in charge of keeping the peace. Learn more »

VP Brings Field Experience from Liberia, Vietnam

Jordan Ryan, vice president for peace programs, may be relatively new to The Carter Center, but his connection to President and Mrs. Carter dates back to the ’70s. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Unveils New Website

Welcome to the Carter Center’s new website which embraces new tools, new technology, and new servers. The result? A new and improved website with an updated look. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Local People Know Best

By Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer, The Carter Center

The Carter Center operates under the firm conviction that people are capable of solving their own challenges, and our role is to provide them the tools and training to do it. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Technology Drives Faster Election Notes

ELMO (short for Election Monitoring) is a Carter Center created electronic data collection and analysis system. Since its introduction in 2011, ELMO has gradually rendered paper checklists obsolete. Equipped with ELMO, observers can submit their checklist data — with more detail than ever before — to headquarters in real time using touchscreen tablets or smartphones. Computers continuously aggregate the data for staff to analyze. Learn more »

Peace Stories: Real Lives, Real Change

Carter Center Peace stories. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Changing the World Through Partnership

By Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer

During my 18 months at The Carter Center, I’ve been struck repeatedly not only by the frequency of our successes, but also by the chance to appreciate them on two vastly differ­ent scales. Learn more »

IN the SPOTLIGHT: Former Ambassador Brings Global Perspective to CEO Post

Posted by the U.S. State Department to Moscow during the Mikhail Gorbachev era, Mary Ann Peters had an up-close view of the Soviet system. "The isolation and repression of the people were palpable," said Peters, a former U.S. ambassador and now chief executive officer of The Carter Center. "We in the embassy knew that talking to people on the streets would get them in real trouble, so we refrained for their sakes." Learn more »

Meet Kirk Embrack: A Taxi Driver Voting for a Better Future

It's election day in Georgetown, Guyana, and taxi driver Kirk Embrack can't stop smiling. "I'm always an optimist," he says. "I would like to see Guyana be back to the days of old, when it was the breadbasket of the Caribbean." Learn more »

Blog | New Project Examines U.S. Laws on Election Observation

By Nandi Vanka, program assistant, Democracy Program

Impartial election observers help build confidence in the integrity of the voting process, and their assessments and recommendations help protect voters’ rights. Learn more »

Blog | Drawing Inspiration in Guatemala

By Chris Hale, associate director, Global Access to Information Program

“Information is power” is a refrain most of us have heard before. The work of The Carter Center’s Global Access to Information Program rests not only on a firm belief that information is power, but that the right to access information is the basic currency for democratic participation and an active and full exercise of citizenship. Learn more »

Blog | How to Head Off Trouble in U.S.-China Relations: Q&A with Carter Center Expert Ying Zhu

The world’s two great superpowers could achieve more progress if there were less suspicion and more cooperation between them, participants in a series of bilateral Carter Center forums say. Learn more »

Blog | President Carter Receives Prestigious Awards from Panama and the LBJ Foundation

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter received back-to-back honors this week in appreciation of his efforts to promote peace and human rights. Learn more »

Blog | Stories from 100 Elections Webcast Archive

In case you missed “Stories from 100 Elections” at The Carter Center on Dec. 2, 2015, an archived webcast of this Conversations at The Carter Center event can be viewed below. Learn more »

Meet Christophe Kabwita: Rebuilding a Life on a Level Field

For five years, Christophe Kabwita has been trying to reclaim what is rightfully his while also trying to keep his family sheltered, fed, and healthy. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Center Poised for Future Impact

By Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer, The Carter Center

Carter Center founders Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter have been an inspiration for our work for more than three decades. With President Carter’s recent announcement that he is in treatment for melanoma, many of our friends have asked what the plans are for Carter Center programs without the Carters. Learn more »

Blog | Video Trip Notes: Jason Carter in Myanmar

The people of Myanmar took a major step in moving their country toward democratic rule, turning out in large numbers to cast their ballots in November 2015 elections. Learn more »

Blog | Reflections on 100 Elections: Q&A with Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter

Last May in Guyana, The Carter Center celebrated its 100th election observation mission. In this Q&A, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, who led the Center’s first election mission to Panama in 1989 and 38 of the 99 that followed, discusses three decades of elections, remembering ones that made history, ones that put his life in danger, and one that brought tears to his eyes. Learn more »

Blog | Forging a New Path in Myanmar: Q&A with Carter Center Expert Jonathan Stonestreet

After more than 50 years of oppressive military rule, the southeast Asian nation of Myanmar is emerging from isolation and taking its first tentative steps toward democracy. Learn more »

Blog | Syria: In Search of Solutions - Webcast Archive

In case you missed “Syria: In Search of Solutions” at The Carter Center on Oct. 13, 2015, an archived version can be viewed below. Learn more »

Blog | A Conversation with the Carters 2015 Webcast Archive

In case you missed “A Conversation with the Carters” on Sept. 15 at The Carter Center, an archived version of the webcast can be viewed below. Learn more »

Carter Center Advances Media Ownership Debate in Peru

Peru's media landscape was shaken last year when El Comercio — one of Peru's oldest and most influential newspapers — acquired a majority stake in the media company Epensa. In response, El Comercio's biggest rival, La República, filed a lawsuit alleging monopolistic practices. Learn more »

Blog | President Carter Champions Women's Human Rights at TEDWomen 2015

At a recent TEDWomen 2015 conference, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter spoke out against violence directed toward women and named abuse of women and girls as the number one human rights violation in the world. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Crying Out for Reform in Congo

In poverty-stricken, mineral-rich Democratic Republic of Congo, The Carter Center advocates for mining reform and human rights. Learn more »

Latest Election Another Important Test for Guyana

The Carter Center launched its fourth election observation mission in Guyana at an important time in the country's history. Learn more »

View from the Inside: An Observer Recalls the Carter Center's First Election

The chanting started soon after Jennie Lincoln and her partner entered the school in the Chiriqui province in Panama on May 7, 1989. Learn more »

In the Spotlight: Director Passionate About Information

Over a decade ago, Laura Neuman attended a gathering in one of India's poorest states to watch colleagues read public documents aloud to villagers. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Center Fueled by Passionate, Brave Staff in Field

By Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer, The Carter Center

Passion and courage abound at The Carter Center. These two valuable resources compel and sustain expatriate staff and hundreds of in-country employees and volunteers who work to wage peace, fight disease, and build hope. Learn more »

Blog | Election Observation Then and Now: Q&A with Carter Center Expert David Carroll

David Carroll, director of the Carter Center’s Democracy Program, has been in the field for about 40 of the Center’s election observation missions and helped manage another 30 or so from headquarters in Atlanta. On the eve of the Center’s 100th election mission, which will take place in Guyana on May 11, he sat down to explain how election observation works and how the field has changed since 1989, when the Center began its election work. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Carter Center Celebrates 100 Elections

Twenty-six years ago, in May 1989, The Carter Center sent its first-ever team of election observers to Panama, where their work exposed General Manuel Noriega's scheme to falsify tally sheets to swing the elections in favor of his handpicked candidate. It established The Carter Center as a leader in what was then the still relatively new field of election observation. Learn more »

Blog | Peace in Liberia, 10 Years Later Webcast Archive

In case you missed “Peace in Liberia, 10 Years Later” at The Carter Center, an archived version of the webcast can be viewed below. Learn more »

Center Mobilizes for Liberia's Ebola Fight

As the Ebola epidemic escalated in Liberia last fall, the nation's ministries and international public health agencies asked The Carter Center to help mobilize communities to identify cases of the disease and prevent its spread. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Congo Election Observers Pick Up New Skills in Tunisia

Many times, the best way to learn something is by doing it. That's why Cyrille Ebotoko and Marie Danielle Luyoyo Pwenika left their homes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in November to serve as Carter Center short-term observers in Tunisia's presidential elections. Learn more »

Blog | Combating Violence and Discrimination Against Women and Girls Webcast Archive

On Feb. 10, 2015, three human rights defenders joined President Carter for a discussion on protecting the rights of women and girls, with a special emphasis on women and peacemaking and on the role religious leaders can play in this effort. Learn more »

Blog | China Program Video Contest Aims to Increase Cross-Cultural Understanding

By Yawei Liu, director, China Program

The relationship between the U.S. and China is an incredibly important one. In the 36 years since former U.S. President Jimmy Carter normalized relations between the two superpowers, the countries have developed a productive and mutually beneficial relationship. But suspicion and mistrust still exist. Much of the Carter Center’s work in China in the last few years has involved advancing U.S.-China relations, in part by nurturing the next generation of leaders in both nations. Learn more »

New Online Forum Advances Rights of Women and Girls

The Forum on Women, Religion, Violence & Power will connect activists across the globe, host roundtable video discussions among them and the general public, highlight success stories, and serve as a resource library and archive. Learn more »

Tunisia's Lone Female Presidential Candidate: 'Continue to Fight'

When student protesters took to the streets in Tunisia at the beginning of the Arab Spring, 55-year-old Kalthoum Kannou was by their side. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Center’s Principles Put into Practice in Liberia

By Ambassador (ret.) Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer

Long before I joined The Carter Center as its chief executive officer in August, I knew of its amazing work as an action-oriented nongovernmental organization improving the lives of people worldwide. It is a great honor to join this mission-driven group that pursues with such vigor and effectiveness the vision of President and Mrs. Carter for peace and global human rights. Learn more »

Blog | Tunisians Vote in First Free Presidential Election - Photos

When Tunisians took to the polls on Sunday, Nov. 23, to elect a president of their choice in a genuine democratic election, a Carter Center team of 85 were on hand to observe the election process and report on its fairness. Learn more »

Blog | Building a Lasting Peace: Where Are the Women? - Webcast Archive

On Nov. 5, 2014, in partnership with The Elders, The Carter Center produced a live webcast of the Conversations event “Building a Lasting Peace: Where are the Women?” Learn more »

Democracy Takes Root in Tunisia

On Sunday, Nov. 23, Tunisians will do something they've never done before: go to the polls to elect the president of their choice in a genuine democratic election. Learn more »

Blog | Mozambique Elections Could Mark Turning Point

By Dr. John Stremlau, vice president, peace programs.

Last week, I was in Mozambique to observe the country’s fifth national election since the end of a bitter civil war that raged for 15 years following the country’s independence from Portugal in 1975. The election was mostly peaceful and far more competitive, transparent, and inclusive than earlier ones we observed. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: A Look Back and Forward

By Dr. John Hardman, chief executive officer.

In September, I will step down as president and CEO of The Carter Center after more than 20 tremendously fulfilling years. I have been awed, inspired, and challenged by the way founders Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter have used their influence to make a difference in the world. Learn more »

Blog | Memories from a Carter Weekend

By Jay Beck, coordinator, Carter Center Weekend.

This year, we moved our annual Carter Weekend fundraiser from February to late June where we gathered amid the majestic mountains of Vail, Colorado, for a weekend of shared laughs and adventures, culminating in an auction to benefit the Center’s work to advance peace and health worldwide. Learn more »

CAF Pledges Continued Support for Americas Program

The Carter Center thanks CAF – Development Bank of Latin America – for renewing its support of our Americas Program work to strengthen peace, dialogue, democracy, and human rights in the Western Hemisphere. Learn more »

Blog | See Chinese Paintings and Calligraphy Demonstration at The Carter Center

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter will provide remarks at an exhibit of Chinese paintings to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the normalization of U.S.-China relations on Thursday, July 17, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Center’s Cecil B. Day Chapel.  The exhibit is co-sponsored by The Carter Center and the Chinese Artists Association, which is China’s premier art institution with 6,000 members. Learn more »

Meet Mahendra Gwacha: Temporary Police Officer in Nepal

Mahendra Gwacha stood with pride as he listened to his supervisor's instructions at the Bagh Bhairab Temple in Kirtipur, Nepal, and then he and his fellow temporary police officers, or myadi prahari, got to work carrying tables and chairs from a nearby elementary school to transform the 900-year-old holy site to a polling place for the next day's constituent assembly election. Learn more »

Blog | Panama Elections Full of Contradictions and Tensions

By Dr. Jennifer McCoy, director, Americas Program.

Panama’s elections were full of contradictions and tensions. Defying the polls, the winning candidate, Juan Carlos Varela, was the sitting vice president estranged from the president and running in opposition. With the possibility of the governing party continuing in office for the first time since the ouster of Manuel Noriega in 1990, fears of a growing concentration of power contributed to Panamanians rejecting the party that had led the highest economic growth rates in the hemisphere and a president with over 60 percent approval ratings. Learn more »

Blog | Justice in Urban Liberia

The Carter Center’s community justice advisors (CJAs) are bringing free legal services – and awareness of how the law should work – to urban slums in Liberia’s capital, Monrovia. Learn more »

Blog | President Carter Discusses Women's Rights on "The Colbert Report"

Former President Jimmy Carter appeared on Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report” on March 25 to discuss his new book, “A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence and Power.” Learn more »

Blog | Join President Carter's Call to Action

The suffering of women and girls can be alleviated when individuals take forceful actions, which can impact larger society, asserts President Carter in his new book “A Call to Action.” Political and religious leaders share a special responsibility, but the fact is that all of us can act within our own spheres of influence to meet these challenges. Learn more »

A CALL TO ACTION: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power

"A Call to Action," a new book by President Carter available March 25 (Simon & Schuster), urges the end of discrimination and abuse against women, calling it the number one challenge in the world today. Learn more »

Mining the Web

Chris McNaboe knows his Syrian opposition armed groups. For the current conflict, he can tell you exactly when a particular brigade formed from previously separate battalions around Aleppo, Syria; how many people are in the brigade; their reason for forming; and what weapons they have. The primary source for this top-level insider info? Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Learn more »

Meet Gopal Siwakoti: Domestic Observer in Nepal

A former political prisoner, Dr. Siwakoti now is one of Nepal's most prominent human rights advocates. His passion for human rights stems from his personal knowledge of what happens when a country lacks democracy and an open society. Learn more »

Blog | From the CEO: Technology Aids Center’s Work

By Dr. John Hardman, chief executive officer.

The Carter Center is pioneering the use of today’s newest technologies in our efforts to wage peace, fight disease, and build hope in the most isolated and inaccessible places on earth. As a result, we are helping people improve their lives more efficiently and cost-effectively than ever before. Learn more »

Blog | Credible Elections are a Starting Point for Change in Madagascar

By Dr. John Stremlau, vice president, peace programs.

The Carter Center was pleased to partner with the Electoral Institute for Sustainable Democracy in Africa for a joint election observation mission to Madagascar’s Dec. 20 legislative and second-round presidential elections. Former Mauritius President Cassam Uteem, EISA Executive Director Dr. Denis Kadima, and I co-led the delegation. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Waging Peace: Nepal's 2013 Election

After casting her ballot this morning in Bhaktapur, 33-year-old Sangita Shrestha felt joy, but the feeling was tempered by a stern message she had for those who will be elected to Nepal's new constituent assembly, "Do your job properly and draft a new constitution as soon as possible." Learn more »

Nepal Elections Give Voice to Democracy

Voter turnout was high as Nepalis defied strikes and scattered violence leading up to Nepal's Nov. 19 constituent assembly election. The Carter Center, which has maintained a team of election observers in Nepal since 2007, deployed 66 observers from 31 countries to provide an independent and impartial assessment of this election process and ensure voting was transparent, credible, and fair. Learn more »

Blog | Critical Nepal Election to End Stalemate, Promote Stability

Carter Center expert David Pottie explains the importance of Nepal’s upcoming election and the role of Carter Center observers. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Pursues Lasting Peace in the Sudans

The geographic lines dividing Sudan and South Sudan “are completely blurry, so we focus on the lines that connect us,” Professor Jok Madut Jok, undersecretary in South Sudan’s Ministry of Culture, said during a “Conversations at The Carter Center” on Oct. 15. Learn more »

Blog | Fellowship Helps Bring Purpose to Passion

Thanks to the generosity of Dr. Robert Pastor and his wife, Margy, a fellowship is now available to support the work and study of a summer fellow in the Carter Center’s Americas Program. The founder and former director of the Americas Program, Dr. Pastor was advisor for Latin American affairs on the National Security Council in the Carter White House. Learn more »

Local Partnerships Key to Success of Liberia Access to Justice Project

In rural Liberia, the formal justice system often is not yet working or accepted, and many communities lack legal resources such as a police station or magistrate. They turn instead to village chiefs and elders to keep the peace. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Celebrates International Right to Know Day with Liberians

By Laura Neuman, manager, Global Access to Information Program

In celebration of International Right to Know Day on Sept. 28, 2013, The Carter Center and local partners in Liberia hosted a series of activities to raise awareness of the value of freedom of information and to encourage the use and full implementation of the country’s 2010 Freedom of Information Act. Learn more »

Blog | The Need for Election Observation in… Norway?

The Nobel Peace Prize, the playwright Henrik Ibsen, the pop group A-ha — this was pretty much the extent of my knowledge about Norway until recently. But this summer, The Carter Center was invited by the Kingdom of Norway to observe their Internet voting trials in connection with this year’s parliamentary elections, which took place on Monday, Sept. 9. With a first visit in July, I have since learned a great deal more. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Trains Youth Leaders in Liberia

On Aug. 19-22, the Carter Center’s Access to Justice Project, in collaboration with Liberia’s ministries of Justice and Internal Affairs, trained 30 youth leaders in Kakata on conflict resolution skills and knowledge of the rule of law. Learn more »

Blog | Update from the field: Nepal Teams Monitor Voter Registration

Watch the Carter Center’s Far Western Region team observing voter registration for upcoming national and local elections in Nepal and discussing their work. Since 2009, The Carter Center has monitored and reported on issues related to Nepal’s peace process. The Center’s long-term observers are deployed throughout the country and often travel to remote communities to gain an understanding of local perspectives. Learn more »

Meet George Toddy: Liberian High School Student Uses Access to Information to Improve Curricula

When Liberian high school student George Toddy failed the math and science sections of his college entrance exam, he was disappointed but not surprised — he had heard that his region had a very high failure rate compared to other parts of the country. Learn more »

Human Rights Defender: Zainah Anwar

All eyes were on Zainah Anwar as she spoke these words during a human rights conference at The Carter Center in the summer of 2013. One sentence, eight words, embodied the three-day forum on the role of faith in women’s rights. "God cannot be God if God is unjust." Learn more »

Carter Center Conference Mobilizes Faith Groups to Advance Women's Rights

Top religious leaders, activists, and religious scholars representing more than 15 countries and over 35 faith-based organizations, universities, and religious bodies, who are committed to making concrete gains in women's rights gathered at The Carter Center June 27-29 for the conference "Mobilizing Faith for Women: Engaging the Power of Religion and Belief to Advance Human Rights and Dignity.". Learn more »

Dialogue Aims to Build Trust, Strengthen Peace Between Sudan and South Sudan

Prominent leaders from Sudan and South Sudan have come together twice this spring to discuss how to strengthen peace and create a lasting understanding between the two countries. Learn more »

Meet Audrey Kasandi: Deputy Polling Station Official for Kenya's 2013 Elections

In 2008, Audrey Kasandi remembers traveling to school in a convoy escorted by armed police for safety, and seeing burned down shells of houses and tent villages stretched across fields full of internally displaced people in Kenya's Rift Valley as the country recoiled from post-election violence. Yet when opportunity arose to serve as deputy presiding officer of a polling station in March 2013, she jumped at the chance despite her fears. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Long-Term Impact in Nepal Rooted in Local Encounters

By Ben Dunant, Carter Center election observer, Nepal

We sat within walls of mud and thatch that warped gently into corners that flaked at the seams, cross-legged on thick carpets with woven Tibetan patterns. Our hosts in the village of Sikles presented us with local food that arrived in portion after portion, all accompanied by steamy hot glasses of raksi, the milky-colored spirit distilled from harvested millet. Learn more »

Carter Center Helps Congolese Mining Communities Seek Redress for Human Rights Violations

The Carter Center is working to enable Tshiamilemba and other local Congolese mining communities to seek redress for such human rights violations and to demand changes moving forward from both mining companies and government. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Carter Center Observes Kenya's Election on March 4

Carter Center election observers in Kenya reported longs lines outside many polling stations on March 4, some nearly a kilometer long, and voters waited in lines for up to six hours or more. Learn more »

Blog | Winter Weekend Attendees Gather for 21st Year to Support Peace, Health in San Diego

It was hard to feel the chill of winter in San Diego, Calif., as donors and supporters from around the world came together for the Carter Center’s annual Winter Weekend fundraiser at the Hotel Del Coronado on Feb. 20-24. Now in its 21st year, the Winter Weekends have raised more than $19 million to support the Center’s work. Learn more »

Blog | Jordan Elections Offer a Test of Recent Reforms

By Ellen Lust, a Carter Center political analyst in Jordan

Jordan’s Jan. 23 parliamentary elections are taking place in a climate of uncertainty, due to dissatisfaction with the pace of electoral reform and frustration with the state of the economy. In late-November there were demonstrations against the monarch, sparked by a sharp increase in gas prices. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: The Carter Center Works for Peace in the Wake of Arab Revolutions

“In all of these countries, the path to democracy is full of challenges,” said Hrair Balian, director of the Conflict Resolution Program at the Center. “The successful outcome will depend on the level of inclusiveness and tolerance of the new orders being created.” Learn more »

Encouraging a More Open China

In early 2010, remote Baimiao Township in Sichuan Province, China, was dubbed the "naked government" when local officials posted its budget online, reportedly disclosing everything from salaries to the cost of notebooks and paper cups. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Sierra Leone Amputees: Enjoying Freedom and Football

While other voters squeezed into polling stations and stood for hours in the Sierra Leone heat to cast ballots in the country's Nov. 17 general election, John Mussa moved straight to the head of the line. One advantage to having only one arm, he said, "is you don't have to wait in the queue to vote." Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: From the Field: Carter Center Observes Sierra Leone Presidential and Parliamentary Elections

The Nov. 17, 2012, presidential and parliamentary elections were the first self-administered elections to be conducted in Sierra Leone since the end of the civil war in 2002, representing an important test for the country's democratic consolidation. Learn more »

Blog | Election Observers Aim to “Illuminate” the Process in Sierra Leone

By Nick Jahr, long-term observer

Sierra Leone’s last election was a historic one: the first time the country’s opposition took power more or less peacefully. This also will be a landmark of another sort: the first election conducted solely …</p> Learn more »

Blog | Jimmy Carter Responds to Questions on Peace, Health, and Hope from Around the World

Former U.S. President and Carter Center Founder Jimmy Carter is answering questions from the public via Facebook, Twitter, and this blog starting Oct. 19, 2012, as part of a year-long commemoration of the Center’s 30th anniversary waging peace and fighting disease worldwide. Learn more »

Blog | President Jimmy Carter, CDC Foundation Hero

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter has been named the 2012 recipient of the CDC Foundation’s Hero Award. The foundation honored President Carter for three decades of visionary leadership focused on saving lives, reducing suffering, and providing hope for millions of the world’s poorest people, as well as for his commitment to achieving a more peaceful and healthy world for us all. Learn more »

Carter Center Works to Protect Congolese Children in Mines

In Katanga Province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), thousands of children spend their days digging, breaking stones, and transporting and washing minerals, risking exposure to dangerous levels of radiation, potential pulmonary diseases, and physical and sexual abuse by peers and adults. Learn more »

Carter Center Works to Protect Congolese Children in Mines

In Katanga Province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), thousands of children spend their days digging, breaking stones, and transporting and washing minerals, risking exposure to dangerous levels of radiation, potential pulmonary diseases, and physical and sexual abuse by peers and adults. Learn more »

Blog | Jimmy Carter to Answer Your Questions via Social Media

For the first time, former U.S. President and Carter Center Founder Jimmy Carter will answer questions from the public via Facebook, Twitter, and this blog, as part of a year-long commemoration of the Center’s 30th anniversary of waging peace and fighting disease worldwide. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Conducts Study Mission to Venezuela Elections

Ahead of key Oct. 7 presidential elections in Venezuela, The Carter Center is conducting an independent study mission to follow the campaign, with political and electoral analysts interviewing political actors and technical experts on the ground. The Carter Center also will send a small group of experts for an informal presence on election day to interview political actors and voters. Learn more »

Meet Egyptian Fatma Emam

During Egypt's January 2011 revolution, human rights researcher and blogger Fatma Emam demonstrated for change in Tahrir Square day after day with thousands of other men and women. Post-revolution though, she found women's rights left behind. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Carter Center Workshops Reduce Partisanship in Venezuela's Electoral Reporting

The Carter Center is encouraging less partisan and more professional media reporting on Venezuela's electoral process through a series of workshops ahead of the country's Oct. 7 presidential election, offering one of the few spaces where journalists from diverse media participate together in the polarized society. Learn more »

Blog | Jimmy Carter Sets Record for Longest Post-White House Career

Today marks an important milestone in President Carter’s life—he has had the longest post-White House career of any president. That’s 31 years of waging peace, fighting disease, and building hope since he left office in January 1981, which the former President says has been some of the most rewarding work of his life. Learn more »

The Carter Center at 30: Champion for Human Rights

Since President Carter's groundbreaking efforts in the White House to place human rights at the center of U.S. foreign policy, the goal of securing human rights for all — civil, political, social, and economic rights — has driven the Carter Center's work to advance peace and health in more than 70 nations. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: The Carter Center at 30: Champion for Human Rights

Since President Carter's groundbreaking efforts in the White House to place human rights at the center of U.S. foreign policy, the goal of securing human rights for all — civil, political, social, and economic rights — has driven the Carter Center's work to advance peace and health in more than 70 nations. Learn more »

Blog | Q&A with Yawei Liu: China’s Impact on African Continent is Focus of New Website

The Carter Center’s China Program recently launched a “China in Africa” website to feature original content from African contributors expressing their views on China’s impact in their respective communities. The project aims to bridge the gap of understanding between Chinese decision-makers and African communities about China’s impact on the African continent. <p>China Program Director Yawei Liu explains the project.…</p> Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Bringing Justice to Rural Liberians, One Village at a Time

For residents of Bor Town, Grand Bassa County, Liberia, a trip to the nearest magistrate's office to solve a dispute isn't just an expense that many in this subsistence-farming community cannot afford; it is also a major trip — eight hours walking by footpath, one way. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center on Leading Edge of Technology Use in Election Observation

The Carter Center is pioneering new technology that allows observations from polling stations across a country to be transmitted to headquarters immediately, allowing a richer picture of an election to emerge in real time – key to being able to determine quicker if an election is credible. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Egypt Voters Hopeful for Country's Future

In June, Egyptians chose the first democratically elected president in the country's history, and despite the challenging circumstances of the process, many voters still felt the moment's importance. Learn more »

Blog | On The Ground in Egypt: Carter Center Mission Witnesses June 16-17 Presidential Runoff Election

A limited Carter Center mission witnessed the June 16-17 runoff election for Egypt's president, with 90 witnesses from 36 countries deployed to follow polling, counting, and those parts of the tabulation processes to which the Center had access.  Learn more »

Blog | From Atlanta to Hiroshima: Interns Honor Carters With a Thousand Paper Cranes for Peace

A chain of 1,000 origami paper cranes, each painstakingly created by members of the Carter Center’s fall 2011 intern class, was recently hung in the Children’s Peace Memorial in Hiroshima, Japan, in honor of President and Mrs. Carter. Learn more »

Blog | Egypt Election: Witnessing Egypt's Historic Presidential Vote, Runoff Election June 16-17

Voting began Wednesday in Egypt, where more than 50 million registered voters may choose the first genuinely democratically elected president in the country’s history. In the Al-Sayeda Zeinab and Al-Sayeda Aisha neighborhoods of Cairo, hundreds of people lined up outside polling stations ahead of poll opening at 8 a.m. Learn more »

Observing Egypt's Election

The Carter Center has deployed 22 international election witnesses to Egypt's upcoming May 23-24 presidential elections and will send a larger delegation of 80 witnesses from over 35 nations several days before the election, led by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter. Many of the Center's witnesses have been with The Carter Center in Egypt since November 2011 and have witnessed the lower and upper house parliamentary elections too. Learn more »

Blog | Developments in the Middle East and North Africa

In view of the pace of change in political events taking place in the Middle East and North Africa, it’s not surprising that the context of an interview completed on April 6 would already be slightly outdated just weeks later. Learn more »

South Sudan: Carter Center Helps New Country Build Democratic Foundations

The Carter Center's peace programs have retained a presence in South Sudan after observing the 2011 referendum on independence in the hopes of contributing to a lasting peace and the establishment of strong democratic foundations. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: The Carter Center at 30: Pioneer of Election Observation

During 2012, The Carter Center celebrates three decades of waging peace, fighting disease, and building hope. This is the first in a series of anniversary features highlighting the Center's global impact since its founding. Learn more »

Blog | On The Ground in Cairo: Carter Center Delegation Witnesses Third Phase of Egypt’s Parliamentary Elections

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director, Carter Center Office of Public Information

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter joined a 40-member Carter Center delegation to witness the third phase of Egypt’s parliamentary elections Jan. 10-11.  The delegation, deployed in Egypt since mid-November for the three-phase election, represents 21 countries.   Learn more »

Dispatches from Egypt: Carter Center Witnesses Reflect on Election Voices, Symbols

Read firsthand accounts from two of the Center's witnesses in Egypt - Nedra Cherif and Matt Hall - who were deployed to Alexandria and Fayoum governorates during the first round of voting. Learn more »

Tunisian Voters Find Hope in Election and Look to Real Change in Everyday Lives

On Oct. 23, Haythem, 28, wrapped himself in a Tunisian flag, stood for four hours in a line that spanned as far as the eye could see on a street in downtown Tunis, and cast a vote for the first time in his life. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Observes Challenging DRC Elections, Committed to Country’s Long-Term Stability

On Nov. 28, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is holding its second democratic multi-party national elections since gaining independence in 1960, and the first to be administered solely by the country’s election commission. Elections in 2006 were overseen by the United Nations. Learn more »

Blog | What Are You Thankful For?

At The Carter Center, we are thankful for all that has been accomplished over the last year: historic elections in Sudan and Tunisia; the end of Guinea worm disease in Ghana; the first graduating class of mental health workers in Liberia; and so much more. Learn more »

Blog | DRC Deaf Voter Education Empowers Those With No Voice

By Max Lockie, Carter Center long-term observer

Carter Center long-term observer Max Lockie is based in Matadi, Democratic Republic of the Congo.  The Center established an office in Kinshasa in August and deployed 10 long-term observers to seven  provinces: Kinshasa, Bas-Congo, Oriental Province, North Kivu, South Kivu, Katanga, and Kasai Oriental. In September, the Center deployed another 10 long-term observers to the remaining provinces.  Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Staff Participate in France-Atlanta 2011 Event

The Carter Center is partnering with the Consulate General of France in Atlanta and the Georgia Institute of Technology as part of “France-Atlanta 2011,” a series of 15 events being held Oct. 26-Nov. 12, designed to strengthen ties in the fields of science, economics, culture, and humanitarian work. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Mapping a Way Forward: Mining in the Democratic Repubic of the Congo

In Congo, a lack of transparent and equitable management of natural resources has excluded most citizens from the benefits of the country’s vast mineral reserves. To address these inequalities, The Carter Center is working to advance economic justice by gathering and publishing information about the mining sector to be used by civil society to support reform in mining practice and policy. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Carter Center Observes as Tunisians Cast Historic Votes for Brighter Future

Long lines of Tunisians waited for hours to vote on Sunday to choose 217 members of a Constituent Assembly to draft a new constitution – many casting a ballot for the first time in their lives – in the country's first open and competitive election in decades. Learn more »

The Carter Center Answers Your Questions About the Historic Oct. 23 Tunisia Elections

The Carter Center will observe the Oct. 23 vote in Tunisia - the first Arab Spring country to hold elections - for a constituent assembly to draft a new constitution. A selection of questions submitted online are answered below by Carter Center observers on the ground in Tunisia. Learn more »

Blog | Voting Day: Liberia's Oct. 11 Presidential and Legislative Elections

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center.

Deborah Hakes, assistant director of the Carter Center's Office of Public Information, reports from Liberia, where the Carter Center's international election observation team monitored the country's Oct. 11 elections. Learn more »

Liberia Elections in Brief: Oct. 11 Presidential and Legislative Elections 'Critical Test'

Presidential and legislative elections in Liberia on Oct. 11 will be a critical test for the country's transition from war to democratic and constitutional government. A Carter Center delegation will observe those elections, led by His Excellency General Dr. Yakubu Gowon, Nigeria's former head of state. Learn more »

Blog | Friends Celebrate 10th Anniversary of the Inter-American Democratic Charter

A group of former leaders and human rights experts serve as a watchdog to threats against democratic stability in the Americas and as a voice to strengthen, promote, and protect democracy and human rights. The group aims to bolster the effectiveness of the Inter-American Democratic Charter, approved on Sept. 11, 2001. Learn more »

Blog | On the Ground in Northwest Tunisia: Rural Voters Hope Elections Bring Much-Needed Change

By Marwa Alkhairo, a Carter Center long-term election observer in northwest Tunisia and Bizerte

Marwa Alkhairo is a Carter Center long-term election observer in northwest Tunisia and Bizerte. "La bas alaik" and "ca va," means "are you well," one phrase said in Arabic, and one in French. These two greetings are indicative of the complexity that one immediately notices upon reaching northwest Tunisia. Learn more »

Empowering Liberian Women Through Access to Information

Like many Liberian women, Ruth Saye has faced violence, subjugation, and loss as a result of her country's devastating civil war, but she was determined to empower women and help them to heal. Learn more »

Blog | Forum Addresses Media Stereotypes, Politicized Reporting in Latin America

Misunderstandings and tensions between Andean countries (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela) and the United States are common, and often reinforced or made worse by charged, politicized reporting in media stories related to these countries. Learn more »

Blog | Share Your Thoughts: What Does "Peace" Mean to You?

Peace is more than the absence of war. There is an inner peace that comes from personal security and personal freedom. Peace also includes the sense of a mother and father that their children will live, that they’ll have food for them to eat, and that they won’t be subject to a lifetime of suffering that could have been prevented. Learn more »

Blog | New Carter Center Planned Giving Website Offers Interactive Tools, Helpful Information

Planned gifts are an excellent way to ensure that The Carter Center continues to wage peace, fight disease, and build hope far into the future, while also offering financial benefits to donors.  The new Carter Center planned giving website offers a wealth of information and interactive tools to help potential donors find a plan that fits their goals. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Southern Sudan Votes for Secession

As the sun rose across Juba on Jan. 9, Lulogo Market area resident Ibrahim, 33, had already waited in line for hours to be among the first to vote in Southern Sudan's historic referendum on self-determination. He clutched a small radio with antenna pointed toward the sky to hear news fragments from BBC and local stations about the referendum. Learn more »

Liberia Advances Toward Open Records

Philomena Bloh-Sayeh is surrounded by mounds of documents in boxes stacked on shelves. "These are marriage documents," she says. "You'll see gaps in the years where some of them were lost during the war." Learn more »

Blog | Human Rights Defender Discusses Importance of Working Together to Advance Women’s Rights

Ratna Osman, acting executive director of Malaysia’s Sisters in Islam, was one of a diverse group of 72 human rights activists and religious scholars from 22 countries to attend the Carter Center’s human rights defenders forum this week in Atlanta. Learn more »

Blog | Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter Urges Promotion of Women's Rights by Religious Communities

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter urged religious communities to promote, not hinder, women’s rights during his opening remarks at the 2011 Human Rights Defenders Forum taking place at The Carter Center in Atlanta, Ga., April 3-6. The remarks were a follow up to a speech he gave to the Parliament of the World’s Religions in 2009. Learn more »

Blog | Upcoming Forum to Promote Women's Rights

From April 3-6, human rights leaders and scholars will gather at The Carter Center to discuss the key challenges that women's rights activists face and ways to work with religious, traditional, and government institutions to advance the protection of these rights. Learn more »

Blog | Forum Identifies Solutions to Improve Cooperation Among Andean Countries and the United States

The Andean-U.S. Dialogue Forum, a citizens' forum created to identify and contribute solutions to multilateral problems and tensions among the Andean countries (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela) and the United States, has issued a report outlining a common agenda to improve cooperation among the nations. Learn more »

Carter Center Observers Witness Southern Sudan's Referendum on Self-Determination

Carter Center observers witnessed the birth of what is expected to be the world's newest nation, following Southern Sudan's Jan. 9-15 referendum on self-determination, with an overwhelming majority--a reported 98.9 percent--voting for secession from Sudan. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Observers Monitor Southern Sudan Referendum on Self-Determination

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

Carter Center observers remain deployed across Sudan and in out-of-country voting locations as voting continues in the referendum on the self-determination of Southern Sudan. Here are images from across Juba on days one and two of voting. Learn more »

Blog | Sudan Referendum Begins Jan. 9; Observers Prepare to Deploy

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

More than 100 Carter Center observers will be deployed across Sudan and in eight out-of-country voting locations to witness voting in the referendum for the self-determination of Southern Sudan, as part of one of the Center’s largest observation missions. Most observers are currently being briefed in Juba, Sudan. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Prepares to Observe Sudan Referendum

The people of South Sudan will vote beginning Jan. 9 to decide whether they wish to remain unified with the North or to form a separate country. Hear more about the significance of the upcoming referendum, the challenges ahead, and the Carter Center's contribution to the process. Learn more »

Workshops Aim to Bring Peace, Stability Through Better Journalism in Bolivia

For veteran journalist Raúl Novillo Alarcón, navigating the streets of La Paz, Bolivia, is easier than keeping pace with the country's political roadmap. "This is a difficult time for journalism in Bolivia," he said. Learn more »

Blog | Voters Show Enthusiasm, Patience in Cote d'Ivoire Elections

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

Outside a polling station in north Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, hundreds of people waited behind closed gates for voting to begin. Women and the elderly sat on chairs they had brought or on the ground. By the time our team of observers arrived at 10 a.m., three hours after polling should have begun, voters were growing anxious in the baking sun. Some had gotten there at 4 or 5 that morning. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center to Observe Historic Cote d’Ivoire and Guinea Elections Back-To-Back

The Carter Center is the only American nongovernmental organization observing the historic presidential elections in Guinea and Cote d’Ivoire, and among the handful of international observers present, we have been deployed longer and more extensively than anyone else. These elections represent the first openly competitive contests for both nations since the end of French colonial rule a half-century ago. Learn more »

Q&A With Pewee Flomoku: Son of Liberia

For Carter Center officer Pewee Flomoku, bringing justice to the citizens of Liberia is personal. Learn more »

Blog | Aijalon Gomes Returns Home to Boston with Jimmy Carter

On August 27, American teacher Aijalon Gomes was reunited with his family in Boston after being imprisoned seven months in North Korea. Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter had embarked on a humanitarian mission to obtain Gomes’ release after he was arrested last January and subsequently sentenced to eight years of hard labor and fined about $600,000. Learn more »

Carter's Diplomacy Helps Free American Prisoner

Jimmy Carter has for years worked behind the scenes to secure the release of political prisoners. But this week he had to do it in person and in the public spotlight, traveling to North Korea to bring an American home. Learn more »

Blog | Homecoming: American Joyful, Relieved to Be Back Home After Long Ordeal

After seven months imprisoned in North Korea, American teacher Aijalon Gomes was reunited with his family this afternoon at Boston Logan Airport. The Carter Center delegation's plane landed at 2 p.m. today. President Carter embarked last Tuesday on a humanitarian mission to obtain Gomes release after he was arrested last January and subsequently sentenced. Learn more »

Stadium Massacre Fuels Survivor's Commitment to Full Democracy for Guinea

Quietly recalling the memory of people jumping from stadium walls to save their lives, and others falling like flies from the gunfire of soldiers, Bademba Diallo remembers thinking in the chaos of that afternoon: "you only die once." Learn more »

Blog | Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter Tours Atlanta Airport Exhibit

During a stopover at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, President and Mrs. Carter viewed, for the first time, the exhibit “Jimmy Carter: Georgia’s Native Son.” The Carters met with Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and airport officials and enlightened a growing crowd with personal memories and behind the scenes insights. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Experts Publish Article on Obligations for Democratic Elections

A groundbreaking project to identify and foster concensus on common standards for what constitutes a genuinely democratic election is the focus of a recently-published article in Democratization by Carter Center Democracy Program Assistant Director Avery Davis-Roberts and Director David Carroll.  Learn more »

As Nepal Struggles, Observers Keep Information Flowing

For the past two years, Carter Center observers have traveled around the country, assessing progress and reporting their findings as Nepal has undergone major transformation. Within the last five years, the Asian country has gone from monarchy to electing a constituent assembly charged with drafting a constitution. Learn more »

Blog | Public Radio International Highlights Judicial System in Liberia

Public Radio International's “The World” examines Liberia's struggle with land disputes, as citizens return home after the war to find others living on land they claim as their own, in a story aired Aug. 3. The story also features the Carter Center’s John Hummel, who explains the country’s need for both a modern legal system and tribal justice system. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Honored by Traditional Council of Liberia, Transitions to New Country Representative

The National Traditional Council of Liberia (NTC) recently honored Carter Center efforts in the country at a farewell ceremony for the Center’s outgoing country representative, John Hummel. Hummel was gowned in traditional clothing as a show of appreciation to him and The Carter Center for “its good will to the Liberian people,” describing him as “a son whom they will always miss.” Learn more »

Blog | 'Jimmy Carter: Georgia's Native Son' Exhibit Opens at Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson Airport

The next time you are waiting for a flight at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, visit a president, and get to know “Jimmy Carter: Georgia’s Native Son.” This large exhibit flanks both sides of the corridor between Security and Concourse T and is packed with rare photos, art, and artifacts giving viewers a snapshot of President Carter’s life as a peanut farmer, a romantic, a politician, a president, a humanitarian, and a Nobel Peace Prize winner. Learn more »

Blog | Guineans Enthusiastic for Sunday's Election; Preparations Continue

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

Through the open second-story window of a mayor’s office outside Conakry, Guinea, came the sounds of hundreds of people passing by, some blowing on whistles and shouting for candidates, others riding in or on cars with horns and speakers blaring. Learn more »

Blog | Guinea Elections: Carter Center Long-Term Observer Blogs From The Field

By Peter Blair, a long-term observer for the Carter Center’s election observation mission in Guinea

Peter Blair is a long-term observer (LTO) for the Carter Center’s election observation mission in Guinea.  Blair graduated with a degree in politics from the University of Nottingham, interned with the Carter Center’s Conflict Resolution Program, and worked as a media and communications assistant for Oxfam Ireland. Learn more »

Blog | Andean-U.S. Forum Meets in Peru

The Andean-U.S. Dialogue Forum met in Lima, Peru, on June 1-2 to develop a common agenda to address problematic issues among the represented countries. The forum, which consists of influential citizens from a variety of sectors within each country, is designed to provide crucial support and reinforcement of diplomatic efforts through a civil society process. Learn more »

Blog | Voice of America Features Carter Center's Access to Justice Project in Liberia

The Carter Center's new initiative to help Liberia’s indigenous leaders manage local disputes was recently featured by Voice of America. The Center’s efforts follow a 15-county consultation on the rule of law with traditional leaders in 2009, and a request from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and the National Traditional Council for help strengthening the capacity of local leaders. Learn more »

Blog | Delegation Observes Challenges to Electronic Voting Technologies in Philippines

By Avery Davis Roberts, assistant director, Carter Center Democracy Program, and Amber Davis, assistant project coordinator, Carter Center Democracy Program

The Carter Center deployed a limited observation mission to observe the use of voting technology to the Philippines’ May 10 election as part of its Democratic Election Standards project, which includes addressing the challenges of observing electronic voting technologies. Learn more »

Blog | Impact Felt from Recent African Regional Conference on the Right of Access to Information

Impact from the Carter Center’s African Regional Conference on the Right of Access to Information, held in Ghana in February, is still being felt around the African continent as stakeholders work to advance the right and foster communication about remaining challenges. Learn more »

Ghanaian ATI Conference Participant Coordinating Campaign for Country's Right to Information Law

In Ghana, where the government is currently debating the passage of a right to information bill, Nana Oye Lithur coordinates the campaign to ensure the proposed law will conform to international standards and enhance transparency and accountability. Learn more »

Join Brookings Institution Scholar Cheng Li in the Field to Study Progress in China's Rural Village Elections

Cheng Li, director of research and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution's John L. Thornton China Center, was part of a small Carter Center delegation that traveled to China in March to advance the Center's programming efforts there. Learn more »

Blog | Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter, Carter Center Experts Brief Ambassadors Circle Members in Atlanta

More than 140 Ambassadors Circle members and friends are gathered at The Carter Center in Atlanta for the 2010 Annual Executive Briefing and Presidential Reception today. The two-day event, featuring firsthand updates from the Center’s peace and health experts, kicked off with an opening evening reception April 22 followed by Conversations at The Carter Center, “Improving the Lives of Women." Learn more »

Blog | Elections Begin in Sudan; Carter Center Observes

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

In Sudan, people across the country began voting on Sunday. Here are images from the first two days of balloting. This is the 78th election observed by The Carter Center. Learn more »

Blog | Carter Center Deploys Observers Throughout Sudan; Voting Begins Sunday

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director, Communications Department

Sudan’s historic elections, the country’s first in 24 years, begin on Sunday and will include nearly one week of voting and counting the ballots.  The Carter Center deployed approximately 70 observers to Sudan’s 25 states. Campaigning officially ended today, and in Khartoum, election materials were packed up. Learn more »

Long-Term Sudan Observers Impressed with Enthusiasm, Mobilization of Communities Readying for Elections

Carter Center long-term observers in Sudan, who have been deployed since August 2009, will soon be joined by a full delegation to observe the country's April elections. In teams of two, long-term observers have assessed pre-election developments, including voter registration in December. Learn more »

Blog | Jimmy Carter to Lead Delegation to Observe Sudan Elections

The Carter Center announced today that former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, former Algerian Foreign Minister and member of the Elders Lakhdar Brahimi, Judge Joseph Warioba, and Carter Center President and CEO Dr. John Hardman will lead the Center’s international election observation delegation to observe Sudan’s elections, which are scheduled to begin on April 11. Learn more »

Blog | Cote d'Ivoire Elections Face Challenges, Carter Center Remains Engaged

Recent political events in Cote d’Ivoire introduced a serious disruption, hopefully temporary, of election preparations and demonstrated how easily the West African country could slide back into conflict. Elections there have been delayed several times; The Carter Center has been the only international election observation group present during the entire process and has deployed teams of observers for different phases. Learn more »

Innovative Smartphone Technology Streamlines Election Observation Process

The Carter Center, long at the forefront of the election observation field, is working with students at Georgia Tech University to take the field forward again – using smartphone technology to streamline the observation process and compile the findings of observers in a fast, efficient, and transparent way. Learn more »

Sudanese Domestic Election Observer Feels Sense of Responsibility To Next Generation

Merekaje Lorna can't wait to vote. A domestic election observer trained by The Carter Center in Sudan, she believes she and other young Sudanese have a responsibility to contribute to credible elections for the sake of the next generation, and as her country approaches its first multi-party elections in 24 years, she looks forward to being able to choose her leaders. Learn more »

Blog | Delegation Observes Village Elections in China

A small Carter Center delegation is in China this week to advance the Center’s programming efforts there. The Center has worked to help standardize the vast array of electoral procedures taking place in local communities and foster better governance for more than a decade, at the invitation of the Chinese government. Learn more »

Blog | Experts to Discuss Recent Crises of Democracy in the Western Hemisphere on March 15

A series of experts, including Carter Center Americas Program Director Jennifer McCoy and former Latin American leaders, will convene on March 15 at Georgia State University (GSU) to analyze recent democratic crises in the region, including the Honduran coup and recent events in Bolivia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, and Venezuela. Learn more »

Blog | Winter Weekend Auction Raises $1,322,300 for Carter Center Peace, Health Initiatives

The Carter Center's annual Winter Weekend auction, held Feb. 27 at Port St. Lucie, Fla., raised $1,322,300 — the second-highest amount raised in the event's history — to benefit the not-for-profit Center’s initiatives to advance peace and health worldwide. The highest bid items at the fundraiser were two original paintings by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, which sold for $290,000. Learn more »

Blog | Andean-U.S. Forum Aims to Strengthen Relations

For the past two days at The Carter Center, influential nongovernmental participants from the United States and the five Andean countries of Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia have gathered for a dialogue aimed to strengthen the historically difficult U.S.-Andean relations and cooperation. Learn more »

Blog | Community Legal Advisors Help Ensure Rural Citizens Have Access to Justice

Working with monitors from the Catholic Justice and Peace Commission (JPC), The Carter Center supports legal advice services in marginalized rural communities through a network of 32 Community Legal Advisors (CLAs) in eight counties. Learn more »

Blog | Jimmy Carter, Carter Center Staff Focus on Historic Sudan Elections

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter met with Sudanese officials to urge peace and stability in the nation as it prepares for its first multi-party elections in 24 years in April, which the Carter Center's international election observation team will monitor. Learn more »

Blog | John Stremlau for CNN.com & Mandela Inspires

On the twentieth anniversary of Nelson Mandela's release from a South African prison, Carter Center Vice President for Peace Programs John Stremlau writes for CNN.com that “Mandela must continue to embody the roles for South Africans that Washington, Lincoln, and King serve in protecting and advancing democracy in America. Learn more »

Blog | Access to Information is a Powerful Tool and Fundamental Human Right

The African Regional Conference on the Right of Access to Information began Sunday in Accra, Ghana. More than 130 participants arrived from 20 African countries as well as Mexico, Canada, India, Australia, and the United States. Learn more »

Blog | Electoral Reform in Nigeria: Drawing on Health Partnership Successes

The Carter Center has deep roots in Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country and one plagued by poisonous politics. Jimmy Carter’s 1978 visit was the first time a U.S. president visited an African state. The Carter Center has worked there since 1988 to eradicate or control neglected diseases like Guinea worm and river blindness. Learn more »

Meet Olawale Fapohunda: Committed to Proposed African Charter

Olawale Fapohunda believes that the proposed African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance (ACDEG) will enable African citizens to more fully participate in the electoral process and advance protection of human rights by African governments. And, in places like his home country of Nigeria, he feels the need for its ratification is vital. Learn more »

Ghana Conference to Address Africa's Right of Access to Information, Develop Action Plan

Listen to Laura Neuman, associate director for the Americas Program at The Carter Center and the access to information project manager, discuss the upcoming conference. Learn more »

China Elections and Governance Online Receives Top Web Awards From China-Based Publications

China Elections and Governance Online, a project of the Carter Center's China Program, has received top honors from two major Chinese publications. Learn more »

Bolivia Long Term Election Observers - Biometric Voter Registration Process

As the only foreign organization monitoring Bolivia's voter registration process, Carter Center long-term observers are witnessing a historic convergence of technology with indigenous cultures in one of South America's most diverse countries. Learn more »

Venezuelan Journalist: Center's Media Training 'An Instrument of Democratization'

For Jordan Bracho, editor-in-chief at Telesur TV in Venezuela, attending The Carter Center "Journalism Beyond Print" workshop in August 2009 led to an immediate improvement in his work and allowed him to develop relationships with colleagues that he wouldn't have otherwise been able to in Venezuela's current media environment. Learn more »

Blog | Day Six: Final Bolivia Election Journal Updates From the Field

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

Carter Center Bolivia Field Office Director Nicolás Fernández Bravo talks about the Center’s findings on election day and the challenges ahead for Bolivia. Learn more »

Day Six: Bolivia Election Journal - Dec.7, 2009

Carter Center Bolivia Field Office Director Nicolás Fernández Bravo talks about the Center's findings on election day and the challenges ahead for Bolivia Learn more »

Blog | Election Day (Day 5): Bolivia Election Journal Updates From the Field

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

Marcelo Varela, associate director of the Carter Center’s Americas Program, talks about election day in Bolivia. Learn more »

Day Five: Bolivia Election Journal - Dec.6, 2009

Marcelo Varela, associate director of the Carter Center's Americas Program, talks about election day in Bolivia. Learn more »

Blog | Day Four: Bolivia Election Journal – Updates From the Field

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

Listen to Carter Center observers Daniel Barnes and Angela Lederach talk about the reception they have received so far as election observers in Bolivia. Learn more »

Day Four: Bolivia Election Journal - Dec.5, 2009

Listen to Carter Center observers Daniel Barnes and Angela Lederach talk about the reception they have received so far as election observers in Bolivia. Learn more »

Blog | Day Three: Bolivia Election Journal – Updates From the Field

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

Watch Barnes and Lederach as they talk about the day's activities and their preparation for election day. Carter Center observers Daniel Barnes and Angela Lederach deployed this morning to Cochabamba, a city that has …</p> Learn more »

Day Three: Bolivia Election Journal - Dec. 4, 2009

Carter Center observers Daniel Barnes and Angela Lederach deployed this morning to Cochabamba, a city that has grown immensely in recent years as people have immigrated from rural areas to find employment. Learn more »

Blog | Day Two: Bolivia Election Journal – Updates From the Field

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

In La Paz, Bolivia, colorful election graffiti and signs may be found on most available spaces along the winding road that leads upward to the city of El Alto. President Evo Morales, Bolivia’s first indigenous president, enjoys overwhelming popularity in La Paz. He is running for a second term in office, courtesy of an article in the country’s new constitution approved by referendum in January that allows him to seek re-election. Learn more »

Blog | Day Two: Last Official Day of Campaigning

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

Today, on the last official day of campaigning before Sunday’s elections, rallies were held throughout Bolivia.  Drummers and dancers (video), joining thousands of supporters (photos, below), show their enthusiastic support during a large rally in El Alto for Evo Morales. Learn more »

Day Two: Bolivia Election Journal - Dec. 3, 2009

Marcelo Varela, associate director of the Carter Center's Americas Program, talks about the unique role of the Center's mission to observe Bolivia's elections on Sunday, Dec. 6. Learn more »

Day Two: Bolivia Elections Journal: Last Official Day of Campaigning - Dec. 3, 2009

Today, on the last official day of campaigning before Sunday's elections, rallies were held throughout Bolivia. Learn more »

Blog | Day One: Bolivia Election Journal – Updates From the Field

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

Watch a brief video of Carter Center long-term observers talking about their work in Bolivia and the country’s new biometric voter registration process. Learn more »

Day One: Bolivia Election Journal - Dec. 2, 2009

Carter Center observers are gathering in La Paz, Bolivia, to be briefed ahead of their deployment to observe Sunday's presidential and legislative elections. Election results will determine who will implement and enforce the new constitution, approved by referendum in January 2009 Learn more »

Blog | Dispatch From Bolivia: The Carter Center Blogs From the 2009 Presidential and Legislative Elections

Join the Carter Center's Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information, on the ground in Bolivia, as she blogs daily through Dec. 7 about the presidential and legislative elections, their importance for the Latin American country, and the Carter Center's role in the process. Learn more »

Ecuador and Colombia: We Can Achieve Much Together

South American neighbors Ecuador and Colombia have a contentious recent history because of strains along their shared border, but seeing the other's point of view has become easier for key citizens participating in the Carter Center's dialogue process between both countries. Learn more »

Bolivia Long-Term Election Observers Witness Convergence of Tradition and Technology

As the only foreign organization monitoring Bolivia's voter registration process, Carter Center long-term observers are witnessing a historic convergence of technology with indigenous cultures in one of South America's most diverse countries. Learn more »

Carter Center-Sponsored Website Redesigned to Engage China's Youth

After seven years online, the Carter Center sponsored-website www.chinaelections.org is one of the most visible platforms in China for the dissemination of democratic awareness and civic culture. Learn more »

Liberian Woman Uses Legal Service to Stop Abuse

For 30 years, Henrietta Gayflor* endured ongoing physical abuse from her partner. After he assaulted her in her front yard one day, Gayflor decided to take action. Learn more »

Carter Center-Trained Bolivian Mediator Helps Families, Individuals Resolve Conflicts

A family of four waits outside Rita Jimenez Huancollo's wood-paneled office at the Integrated Justice Center (CIJ) in La Paz, Bolivia, husband and wife with eyes cast down, he folding and unfolding papers and she glancing sideways every so often to quietly encourage their children to sit patiently. Learn more »

Attaining a Culture of Peace in Bolivia

In Bolivia, political disputes often escalate to the brink of conflict. One of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere, Bolivia's ethnic and cultural diversity, as well as struggles over natural resources, fuel strong social and economic tensions. Learn more »

Human Rights House Provides Safe Space for Activists, Supports Citizens in Democratic Republic of the Congo

KINSHASA....The initial vision for the Carter Center's Human Rights House was to provide both a space and forum for human rights activists in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, building on the momentum of the 2006 elections. Learn more »

Human Rights House Provides Safe Space for Activists, Supports Citizens in Democratic Republic of the Congo

The initial vision for the Carter Center's Human Rights House was to provide both a space and forum for human rights activists in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, building on the momentum of the 2006 elections. Learn more »

Profile: Valerie Harden, Deputy Field Director, Carter Center Kinshasa Field Office

When she began work as a job counselor almost 10 years ago in Atlanta with refugees from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Valerie Harden never imagined she would one day play a role in the restoration of their war-torn country. Learn more »

Constitutional Crisis in Honduras: An Expert Q&A

Dr. Jennifer McCoy, Director, Americas Program, takes your questions. Learn more »

East Jerusalem Family Forced to Demolish Part of Own Home, Center Expert Cites Abuse of Permit System

From the roof of his family's home in East Jerusalem within the walls of the Old City, Raed Sa'id points to the golden Dome of The Rock, which is glowing in the late-afternoon sun. Learn more »

Voter Encouraged by Carter Center Presence During Lebanon Elections, Hopeful About Country's Political Future

Lama Naja represents hope for Lebanon's political future. A politically independent young person in a country full of strong political passions and fierce party loyalties, she instead voted on June 7 for the people she thought may keep their campaign promises. Learn more »

Blog | Election Day in Lebanon: Carter Center Observers Monitor Polling Sites

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

A multinational Carter Center delegation observed Lebanon’s June 7 parliamentary elections, monitoring polling sites throughout the country’s 25 qadas (districts). Led by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former Yemini Prime Minister Abdulkareem Al-Eryani, the 60 member delegation included elected officials, electoral and human rights experts, regional specialists, and political and civic leaders from more than 20 countries in North America, Africa, Europe, South America, Asia, and the Middle East. Learn more »

Lebanon Elections 2009 Summary

Election Day in Lebanon: Carter Center Observers Monitor Polling Sites Learn more »

Middle East Dispatches

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter visits Syria, Israel, West Bank, and Gaza. Learn more »

Blog | June 10: Deborah Hakes Blogs From the 2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

<p>Deborah Hakes is assistant director of public information for The Carter Center.</p> <p>For the past week and a half (and for weeks before I arrived), the Carter Center office for the elections was a scene of constant intense activity at all hours of a day. Now the field staff has returned to their regular office outside the hotel, and Atlanta-based …</p> Learn more »

Carter Center Blogs - Deborah Hakes Blogs From 2009 Lebanon Elections

For the past week and a half (and for weeks before I arrived), the Carter Center office for the elections was a scene of constant intense activity at all hours of a day. Now the field staff has returned to their regular office outside the hotel, and Atlanta-based staff are flying home or to another field project. Learn more »

Blog | June 9: Deborah Hakes Blogs From the 2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

I’ve been sharing my experiences with you from Lebanon for the past week and thought it was also important to share a few of the many other voices whose hard work made the election observation mission possible. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Lebanon Parliamentary Elections

Lebanon held successful parliamentary elections on June 7, 2009, the results of which were accepted peacefully by both sides. The Carter Center deployed 60 observers from 23 countries to assess voting, counting, and tabulation processes, led by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former Prime Minister of Yemen Abdul-Kareem al–Eryani. Learn more »

Carter Center Blogs - Deborah Hakes Blogs From 2009 Lebanon Elections

2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections - Deborah Hakes Blogs From Carter Center Election Observation Mission Learn more »

Blog | June 8: Deborah Hakes Blogs From the 2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections

Things are wrapping up here for this phase of the Carter Center’s election observation mission to Lebanon. Our long-term observers will remain deployed to monitor the post-election processes. Learn more »

Carter Center Blogs - Deborah Hakes Blogs From 2009 Lebanon Elections

2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections - Deborah Hakes Blogs From Carter Center Election Observation Mission Learn more »

Blog | June 7: Deborah Hakes Blogs From the 2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

The long lines surprised all of us. They wound down stairs and through the hallways of elementary schools, municipal buildings, and other polling sites where we visited. It made walking from polling station to polling station a very crowded affair. The voters seemed in good spirits though, often cheering and yelling “Jimmy Carter!’ when they realized just which international observers were there. Learn more »

2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections - Deborah Hakes Blogs From Carter Center Election Observation Mission

Lebanon Parliamentary Elections 2009- Deborah Hakes Blogs From Carter Center Election Observation Mission Learn more »

Blog | June 6: Deborah Hakes Blogs From the 2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

It is the eve of Lebanon’s parliamentary elections and things seem quiet. Our observers were deployed yesterday, and they continue regular check-in calls to let us know that they are safe. Meanwhile, the core staff in Beirut are finalizing preparations for tomorrow – election day Learn more »

Lebanon Parliamentary Elections 2009 - Deborah Hakes Blogs from Lebanon

It is the eve of Lebanon's parliamentary elections and things seem quiet. Our observers were deployed yesterday, and they continue regular check-in calls to let us know that they are safe. Learn more »

Blog | June 5: Deborah Hakes Blogs From the 2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

Today, I headed south to Lebanon’s border with Hrair Balian, the director of the Conflict Resolution Program at The Carter Center, to be briefed by the United Nations Interim Forces in Lebanon (UNIFIL), and to see what the pre-election environment was like there. Learn more »

Carter Center Blogs - Deborah Hakes Blogs From 2009 Lebanon Elections

Today, I headed south to Lebanon's border with Hrair Balian, the director of the Conflict Resolution Program at The Carter Center, to be briefed by the United Nations Interim Forces in Lebanon (UNIFIL), and to see what the pre-election environment was like there. Learn more »

Blog | June 4: Deborah Hakes Blogs From the 2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

Across Lebanon today, more than 11,000 polling station workers could cast their ballots early for the parliamentary elections. I traveled to Baabda, a town in the mountains southeast of Beirut, to watch the process. Baabda has six seats being contested in these elections, and per Lebanon’s complicated distribution of parliamentary seats by religion, three will be filled by Maronite Christians, two by Shia Muslims, and one by a Druze. Learn more »

Carter Center Blogs - Deborah Hakes Blogs From 2009 Lebanon Elections

2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections - Deborah Hakes Blogs From Carter Center Election Observation Mission Learn more »

Blog | June 3: Deborah Hakes Blogs From 2009 Lebanon Parliamentary Elections

By Deborah Hakes, assistant director of public information for The Carter Center

I’ve only been in Beirut, Lebanon, for 24 hours, but I can already tell that the parliamentary elections to be held this coming Sunday are going to be a fascinating process, and I am thrilled to be a part of it. The world is watching what happens here, and I will get to see it firsthand. I’ll do my best to share what I see with you. Learn more »

Carter Center Blogs - Deborah Hakes Blogs from Lebanon Election

Join the Carter Center's Deborah Hakes, in Lebanon with the multinational Carter Center delegation, as she blogs daily about the sights and sounds "on the ground" and the importance of these elections for the country and region. Learn more »

Deborah Hakes Blogs From 2009 Lebanon Elections

I've only been in Beirut, Lebanon, for 24 hours, but I can already tell that the parliamentary elections to be held this coming Sunday are going to be a fascinating process, and I am thrilled to be a part of it. The world is watching what happens here, and I will get to see it firsthand. I'll do my best to share what I see with you. Learn more »

Carter Center Deploys Election Observation Delegation to Lebanon's June 7, 2009, Parliamentary Elections

A multinational Carter Center delegation will observe Lebanon's June 7 parliamentary elections, monitoring polling sites throughout the country's 25 qadas (districts). Learn more »

New York Times Spotlights Gender Violence and Rule of Law in Liberia

New York Times journalist Nicholas Kristof recently traveled to Liberia to explore progress against sexual and gender violence there and the impact of the Carter Center's rule of law project. Learn more »

Carter Center Observers Prepare for Upcoming Lebanon Election

With accreditation from Lebanon's Ministry of the Interior and Municipalities, The Carter Center dispatched six long-term observers to Lebanon in March to monitor the electoral process leading to parliamentary elections on June 7, 2009. Learn more »

A Day in the Life of a Long-Term Observer in Lebanon

Marwa Alkhairo is a long-term observer in the Carter Center's election observation mission in Lebanon. This is her first election mission. She graduated from Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service with a master's degree in Arab studies in 2008 and certificate in refugee and humanitarian studies. She has had expansive experience in international NGOs, research institutes, film, and advocacy work as related to issues in the Arab world. Learn more »

Next Steps in the Right of Access to Information in the Americas

Although about one half of all the countries in the Americas now have some form of access to information legislation, and almost all of the remaining countries are considering establishing a statutory right to information, there remain a number of critical challenges. In many countries, implementation and enforcement of the law has been weak. In other places there are signs of backsliding where once vibrant laws are now politicized or ineffectual; and in all cases there is a need to broaden and deepen the usage of the right to information. Learn more »

Blog from Latin America: Americas Program Director Jennifer McCoy Writes From Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil

Dr. Jennifer McCoy, director of the Carter Center's Americas Program, is traveling with former U.S. President Jimmy Carter as a member of the Carter Center delegation to Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil from April 27 to May 4, 2009. Read more about the trip and read her blog entries below. Learn more »

Carter Center Long-Term Observers Reflect on Their Experiences in Aceh, Indonesia

Long-term election observers Whitney Haring-Smith and Eunsook Jung have been deployed in Aceh since March 2009 as part of the Carter Center's mission to observe Indonesia's April 9, 2009 parliamentary elections. Learn more »

Carter Center Conducts Human Rights Training for Congolese Police Officers

Until recently, police officers in Kimbasneke, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), investigated case files at a music bar or other public space because they didn't have office space. When it rained, they carried the papers under their shirts to preserve the files. Learn more »

Ghana Voter Committed to Peaceful Election Process; Encourages Peers to Vote

As the sun rose on Ghana's second election day in two weeks, Alice Appoh had already stood in line for hours to wait for voting to begin, her two-year-old child sound asleep on her back. Learn more »

Carter Center Delegation Observes Ghana's Peaceful, Historic Elections

More than 50 Carter Center observers witnessed Ghana's Dec. 7 elections, the results of which will determine the country's next president and parliament. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Delegates Observe Election Day in Ghana

Fifty–seven Carter Center observers witnessed Ghana's Dec. 7, 2008, presidential and parliamentary elections. Overall, the Center’s observers visited more than 300 polling stations on election day, witnessing the opening, voting, and closing of voting across the country. Learn more »

Carter Center Hosts Chinese Delegation to Witness U.S. Elections in San Francisco, Washington, D.C.

A Chinese delegation hosted by The Carter Center is studying today's U.S. election in the San Francisco and Washington, D.C., areas to learn more about election procedures and reduce misperceptions by the Chinese of the American democratic system. Learn more »

Blog | The Carter Center Conflict Resolution Program: Q&A With Hrair Balian

Hrair Balian, director, Conflict Resolution Program, joined The Carter Center in 2008. Balian oversees the program’s efforts to monitor conflicts around the world and coordinates the Center’s cross-program efforts in the Middle East. He is also an adjunct professor at the Emory University Law School, teaching an advanced international negotiations seminar. Learn more »

The Carter Center Conflict Resolution Program - Q&A With Hrair Balian

The Carter Center Conflict Resolution Program works to prevent and resolve deadly conflicts by monitoring early warnings in fragile states and through timely, targeted, and impartial interventions. When possible and appropriate, rapid-response interventions--negotiations, mediations, or facilitation--are accomplished through the personal involvement of President and Mrs. Carter, with the support of program staff. In other instances, senior staff conduct interventions with support from senior diplomats around the world. We also engage in sustained post-conflict peacebuilding to promote reconciliation and the restoration of the rule of law. Additionally, the program targets challenging contemporary issues of international peace and security not addressed by other institutions. Learn more »

President Carter Q&A on Middle East

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter led a mission to Israel, the West Bank, Egypt, Syria, Saudi Arabia, and Jordan April 13-21, 2008, as part of the Carter Center's ongoing effort to support peace, democracy, and human rights in the region. Accompanying him were former First Lady Rosalynn Carter; son Jeffrey Carter; former U.S. Congressman Stephen Solarz; Dr. Robert Pastor, senior Carter Center advisor; and Hrair Balian, director of the Center's Conflict Resolution Program. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Strengthening Liberia's Rule of Law

Involved with Liberia since 1991, when invited by West Aftican leaders during the country's first civil war to assist in the peace process, The Carter Center works to strengthen the rule of law. Learn more »

African Union and Carter Center Partnership Q & A with David Pottie

The Carter Center and the African Union (AU) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on July 29, 2008, at the AU Commission in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The MOU will enable the Center to work closely with the AU in areas such as election monitoring, human rights, and strengthening democracies. Carter Center Vice-President for Peace Programs John Stremlau signed on behalf of The Carter Center while Department of Political Affairs Commissioner Julie Joiner signed on behalf of AU Commission Chairperson H.E. Jean Ping. Learn more »

New Video: "The Carter Center in Latin America" Highlights Promotion of Meaningful Democracy

The Carter Center works toward the collective protection and promotion of meaningful democracy in the Western Hemisphere. The Center strives to enhance the quality of democracy and its ability to improve the lives of individuals in three areas: Learn more »

Lebanon Election Observation Feature

Roger Bryant is a long-term observer in the Carter Center's election observation mission in Lebanon. After a career in the British Navy, Roger worked with the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) mission to Bosnia-Herzegovina for a number of years before becoming involved in election work abroad as administrator and then as a long-term observer. Roger was a member of the Carter Center's observation mission to Nepal in 2007-8. Learn more »

Palestinians in Gaza Ask Jimmy Carter: Former U.S. President Answers Videotaped Questions

Gazans gather, above, to watch the April 21 Jerusalem press conference of former U.S. President Jimmy Carter. Click here, or on images above, to view video footage of the press conference and the Palestinian observers in Gaza. Learn more »

Websites Create Stage for Political Debate in China

Websites sponsored by The Carter Center have become an important portal for political reform in China, engaging their audiences with news articles translated into both Chinese and English and offering a platform to debate current affairs in a traditionally closed society. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Carter Center Observes Historic Nepal Elections

The Carter Center’s international election observation delegation to Nepal’s April 10, 2008, elections, led by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, and Dr. Surakiart Sathirathai, former deputy prime minister of Thailand, included 62 observers from more than 20 nations. Learn more »

Nepal Elections Mark New Political Beginning

Carter Center election observers witnessed a historic vote in Nepal on April 10 creating a constituent assembly to draft a new constitution for the country that will likely abolish the 240-year-old monarchy. Learn more »

Blog | The Carter Center Partners with the African Union: A Q&A With David Pottie, Associate Director, Carter Center Democracy Program

The Carter Center and the African Union (AU) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on July 29, 2008, at the AU Commission in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The MOU will enable the Center to work closely with the AU in areas such as election monitoring, human rights, and strengthening democracies. Learn more »

International Carter Center Delegation Observes Historic Nepal Elections

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter led the Carter Center's international election observation delegation to Nepal's historic constituent assembly elections, co-led by Dr. Surakiart Sathirathai, former deputy prime minister of Thailand. Learn more »

Blog | The Nepal Elections and The Carter Center: A Q&A With David Pottie, Associate Director, Carter Center Democracy Program

The constituent assembly election is a central feature of Nepal’s ongoing peace process and was agreed to by all parties in the Nov. 21, 2006, Comprehensive Peace Accord. The elections will create a representative body charged with drafting a new constitution for Nepal and give the people of Nepal their first opportunity to speak out and express their views on the future direction of the country. Learn more »

The Nepal Elections and The Carter Center: A Q&A With David Pottie, Associate Director, Carter Center Democracy Program

The constituent assembly election is a central feature of Nepal's ongoing peace process and was agreed to by all parties in the Nov. 21, 2006, Comprehensive Peace Accord. The elections will create a representative body charged with drafting a new constitution for Nepal and give the people of Nepal their first opportunity to speak out and express their views on the future direction of the country. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Life on the Edge: Ecuador's Border with Colombia

The Carter Center conducted a conflict–related development analysis in two towns along the Ecuador northern border. The analysis focuses on development in the border zone, including access to justice and human rights, citizen security, and youth and social inclusion, and will serve as input for the creation of public policies for development in the northern border zone by Ecuador’s government. Learn more »

Life on the Edge: Carter Center Project Examines Development Challenges on Ecuador-Colombia Border

Buenaventura Morales has a kind face worn weary from life, and friendly eyes that hide the depression plaguing him since he fled his native Colombia after massacres to his village in 2004. His wife died along the way, and he said he feels unable to support his four children by himself; he can't find a job in this poor border region of Ecuador. He plans to rent a small plot of land nearby to grow rice and trade it among the large refugee community here. Life on the border between Ecuador and Colombia is tough, and complicated. Learn more »

Blog | Political Reform in China: Q&A with Yawei Liu, director, Carter Center China Program

What struck me most about the country is not how the people have changed:  it is how the government has changed because of people.  The government seems to be more keenly aware of the people’s needs, of the growing gap between the rich and the poor, of the international pressure on China to change its policies on issues such as environmental pollution, global warming, energy saving, and of its own source of legitimacy. Learn more »

Political Reform in China: A Q&A with Yawei Liu Director, Carter Center China Program

What struck me most about the country is not how the people have changed: it is how the government has changed because of people. The government seems to be more keenly aware of the people's needs, of the growing gap between the rich and the poor, of the international pressure on China to change its policies on issues such as environmental pollution, global warming, energy saving, and of its own source of legitimacy. Learn more »

Access to Information Q&A With Laura Neuman, Carter Center Americas Program

In this Q&A, the Carter Center's Laura Neuman, assistant director of the Americas Program and Access to Information Project manager, shares her insights. Learn more »

Conference to Address Advancements, Challenges to Worldwide Access to Public Information Laws

Access to public information matters to the average citizen: it is a human right with the power to make a difference in both individual lives and in the life of a community. Although great advances have been made worldwide over the last decade, countries still face important challenges in the implementation and enforcement of access to information laws. Learn more »

Blog | Q&A with Laura Neuman on Access to Information: A Fundamental Right

Access to information is a fundamental right. Allowing people to seek and receive public documents serves as a critical tool for fighting corruption, enabling citizens to more fully participate in public life, making governments more efficient, encouraging investment, and helping persons exercise their fundamental human rights. For this reason, The Carter Center is actively involved with governments and civil society. Learn more »

Carter Center Assists Liberia's Ministry of Justice in Strengthening Rule of Law

At the invitation of the Government of Liberia, the Carter Center's "Strengthening the Rule of Law and Combating Impunity" project, begun in October 2006, is filling critical gaps in the delivery of justice in rural Liberia. Learn more »

Q&A With Liberia's Minister of Justice Philip A.Z. Banks

"Frankly, I would like to see Liberia at the apex of the continent, on top. I believe very strongly and very sincerely that in spite of what we've been through-the devastation and degradation and all of the other negatives that we can think of-we still have the propensity to rise highly and rigorously." Learn more »

Q&A With Liberia's Solicitor General Tiawan S. Gongloe

Tiawan S. Gongloe, solicitor general of Liberia, knows his country's justice system from both sides of a jail cell. As a student activist in the late 1970's, he was imprisoned and beaten for speaking out against the government of then-president William Tolbert, and later for speaking out against President Charles Taylor. Learn more »

Carter Center Partners with Traditional Leader of Liberian Women

Mama Tumeh, leader of the country-wide Traditional Women for Peace – a Carter Center partner — is regarded as the spiritual leader of women throughout Liberia. Her work is bringing a message of hope and empowerment to women who are survivors of the country's 14-year civil war. Learn more »

Q&A With Oscar Dolo, Director of the Modia Drama Club

The Modia Drama Club, based in Gbarnga, Liberia, is a Carter Center partner in the rule of law public education and awareness campaign. Members travel to Liberia's most remote villages by foot, motorcycle, and four-wheel drive, to educate entire communities – often gathered in open-air settings – through skits, music, and interactive dialogue on Liberia's new laws. Learn more »

Carter Center Helps Educate Liberians on Laws, Rights

Although the country's decades of violence are over, Liberia's women continue to face their own private wars: marital rape, domestic abuse, poverty. The Carter Center, at the invitation of Liberia's Ministry of Justice and in partnership with community-based organizations in the West African country, is helping close the violence gap through local education programs and governmental capacity building. Learn more »

Blog | Pakistan Crisis Q&A With Karin Ryan, Carter Center Human Rights Program Director

The Carter Center, since 2003, has warned of the dangers that autocratic leaders would take advantage of the “war on terror” to suppress legitimate political opposition and basic human rights. What General Musharraf has done is to try to wipe away the results of decades of effort by human rights and judicial leaders to restrain the powers of executive authority in Pakistan, which for half of the country’s history has been in the hands of the military. Learn more »

Pakistan Crisis Q&A With Karin Ryan, Carter Center Human Rights Program Director

The Carter Center, since 2003, has warned of the dangers that autocratic leaders would take advantage of the "war on terror" to suppress legitimate political opposition and basic human rights. What General Musharraf has done is to try to wipe away the results of decades of effort by human rights and judicial leaders to restrain the powers of executive authority in Pakistan, which for half of the country's history has been in the hands of the military. An independent judicial system has been built with hard-won gains of dedicated jurists and those who have risked their lives to bring human rights into the court room. Learn more »

Remembering Guyana's 1992 Elections, an excerpt from 'Beyond the White House,' by Jimmy Carter

In 2007, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter wrote "Beyond the White House," about his post-presidency work with The Carter Center. In it, he reflected on a number of election observation missions, including the Center's first to Guyana, in 1992. An excerpt from the book, published by Simon and Schuster, is reprinted here. Learn more »

Election Delayed, But Long-Term Observers Continue in Nepal

Nepal has undergone tremendous changes in the past year. A 2006 peace agreement ended a decade of fighting between government forces and the Maoists, and the country's king gave up all power other than his ceremonial status. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Long-Term Election Observers Go the Distance in Nepal

The Carter Center observed Nepal’s constituent assembly elections, which were delayed from the scheduled Nov. 22, 2007, date. The Center’s long-term observers (LTOs) have been deployed throughout the country since March 2007. Currently the only international observation mission in Nepal, the Center’s well–established reputation for professional and impartial observation enables it to gather a wide range of information from diverse actors. Learn more »

Long-Term Election Observer Reflects on Being Part of Nepal "Roaming Team"

Jason Katz is a long-term observer (LTO) for the Carter Center's election observation mission in Nepal. Katz previously worked at the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs in Washington, D.C., and served as an election monitor during both rounds of elections in Peru in 2001. Learn more »

Nepal Elections: By Foot, Car, and Plane, Observer Assesses Country's Readiness

Stefanie Gross was a long-term observer (LTO) for the Carter Center's election observation mission in Nepal from March-December 2007, and wrote her reflections during this time. Originally from Germany, Stefanie completed her undergraduate degree in political studies and her postgraduate degree in conflict resolution in the United Kingdom before interning at The Carter Center in 2006. Learn more »

Karin Ryan: Director Assists Activists Fighting for Human Rights

After Iraq's 2006 elections, the United States and other Western governments celebrated that country's move toward democracy. But as Karin Ryan knows from her 20 years with The Carter Center, an election is only a small step on the long road toward a true democratic government. Learn more »

Blog | Two Palestines? What is Risked by a "West Bank first" Policy? Q&A with Middle East Experts

In the following Q&A, panel members from “Two Palestines? What is Risked by a ‘West Bank First’ Policy?” held at The Carter Center in July 2007, answer audience questions that remained following the event. Learn more »

Carter Center Experts Q&A - Two Palestines? What is Risked by a "West Bank first" Policy? Q&A with Middle East Experts

In the following Q&A, panel members from "Two Palestines? What is Risked by a 'West Bank First' Policy?," held at The Carter Center in July 2007, answer audience questions that remained following the event. Learn more »

Venezuela RCTV Station Closure: Q&A with Americas Program Director Jennifer McCoy

President Chávez announced that he would deepen the Bolivarian Revolution and establish "21st century socialism." He draws on Simón Bolívar's 19th century ideas of South American integration, and on a new approach to socialism based on a mixed economy with majority state control, distribution of oil revenues, worker participation in businesses, and greater popular participation in political decision-making. Learn more »

Carter Center Issues Final Report on 2006 Nicaragua Elections

Final report of the Carter Center's election observation team on the 2006 Nicaragua elections. Held November 5, 2006, this was the fourth national election in Nicaragua observed by The Carter Center since 1990. Learn more »

Q&A With Matthew Hodes, J.D. Former Director, Carter Center Conflict Resolution Program

Many of the governments and nations sustained by Cold War patronage are now facing internal opposition as they attempt to adapt to the new world order. While several of the current conflicts cross borders and involve multiple state actors, these conflicts also often have ethnic, religious, and/or other identity-based roots. Learn more »

David Carroll: Director Finds Satisfaction in Helping Struggling Democracies

When Liberia's first female president won in 2005, her opponent charged that the election results were tainted. But Carter Center Democracy Program Director David Carroll knew otherwise.> Learn more »

Give Peace a Chance: Nicaragua's 2006 Presidential Elections (Carter Center Slideshow)

The Carter Center deployed a 62-member delegation to observe Nicaragua’s 2006 election. Carter Center observers David Evans and Sandra Flores, a French citizen, were based in Rio San Juan, which shares its river and border with Costa Rica. They arrived in the region via small plane on a muddy landing strip. Learn more »

International Delegation Observes DRC Elections

Kinshasa....A 45-member international Carter Center delegation led by former Prime Minister of Canada Joe Clark observed the Democratic Republic of the Congo's presidential runoff elections Oct. 29. Carter Center Peace Programs Associate Executive Director John Stremlau was co-leader of the delegation. Learn more »

John Stremlau: Role at Center Allows Director to Keep Close Ties With African Continent

Dr. John Stremlau views the recent elections held in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as both triumphant and tragic. "It was quite moving to see the Congolese people turn out to vote," he said. "At the same time," he added, "it was depressing to see how the country and its people have suffered so greatly." Learn more »

Profile: Marcel Wetsh'okonda, Congolese Human Rights Defender

Marcel Wetsh'okonda fights for human rights laws to be passed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a country where 1,000 people die each day from disease, hunger, and violence. It is no easy task. Learn more »

Carter Center Peace Stories from the Field - DR Congo Family

The afternoon sun catches Yayu Zonveni's face near the door of her otherwise shadowy home in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). She sits in a blue plastic chair waiting for customers to buy the soda and beer she sells from her house; 200 Congolese francs for a Coke, 400 for a beer. It takes her a day and a half to sell a case of 24 bottles, for which she receives a profit of 400 FC, or almost $1US. Learn more »

Meet Jacob Lablah: Once a schoolteacher, Jacob Lablah now teaches civics to his fellow Liberians

Looking across the many rows of wood-and-mud shacks that house more than 12,000 people in a camp for displaced persons in Margibi County, Liberia, Jacob Lablah knows he still has work to do. The scene inside the camp varies little from day to day. Women sit patiently next to stands selling combs, seasonings, and rice while children carry toys made from tin cans and old plastic bottles, their shirts in tatters and hanging off their shoulders. Men play checkers on a splintered wooden board for hours. People here have no jobs, no means to improve their lives, and no real place to call home. Learn more »

One Village Votes: Elections in Shidong, China

One of the most important democratic experiments of the last 25 years has been the movement in 600,000 villages across China toward competitive elections, allowing 75 percent of the nation's 1.3 billion people to elect their local leaders. The Carter Center has worked with the Chinese government to help standardize the vast array of election procedures taking place in this new democratic environment and to foster good local governance. Learn more »

Blog | Political Finance Reform and Media Mapping: An Expert Q&A With Shelley McConnell

In this Q&A, Dr. Shelley McConnell, senior associate director of the Carter Center’s Americas Program, discusses the groundbreaking media mapping project: its impetus, implementation, and hoped-for impact on democratization in the Americas. Learn more »

Blog | U.N. Human Rights Council: The Center's Role, New Body's Mandate in Expert Q&A

A new Human Rights Council for the United Nations was adopted March 15 by the U.N. General Assembly, replacing the Commission on Human Rights, originally established in 1946. In this Q&A, Karin Ryan, senior advisor, Human Rights Program, discusses the Center’s key role in the Council’s passage and what the Council means for global human rights. The new Council plans to elect its first 47 members May 9 and hold its first meeting June 19, after the Commission is disbanded June 16. Learn more »

Blog | Atlanta Journal Constitution Palestine Election Q&A With David Carroll

Former President Jimmy Carter will lead a team of 80 observers today in monitoring legislative elections in the Palestinian territories. The team hopes to provide “an impartial and accurate report” on elections that are as significant as they are controversial. One development that has raised eyebrows in the West: the political participation of Hamas, a group the United States considers a terrorist organization. Learn more »

Blog | Declaration of Principles and Code of Conduct: A Q&A With Democracy Program Director David Carroll, Ph.D.

Although election observation has existed for many decades, the end of the Cold War in the late 1980s triggered a dramatic expansion in the number of election observation missions. Hear from Carter Center's David Carroll who manages the Democracy Program's projects on election observation, civil society strengthening, and promotion of the rule of law. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Elections Mark Turning Point in Liberia's History

The Carter Center observed Liberia’s historic presidential and legislative elections on Oct. 11, 2005. Only two years earlier, Liberia had emerged from 14 years of civil warfare, which had left over a million people displaced and the country’s infrastructure destroyed. More than 1.3 million people registered to vote, which was estimated to be 90 percent of the eligible population. Learn more »

Stories from Liberia: Field Officer Reflects on Election Prep in a War-Torn Land

Liberians, their country devastated by years of civil war, head to the polls in October 2005 in the most promising opportunity the country will have to establish a fragile, post-conflict democracy. Liberia's destroyed infrastructure, pervasive poverty, 85 percent illiteracy rate, and bitter electoral history are compounding the challenges of providing civic education and making technical arrangements for the election process. Learn more »

Blog | Q&A With Jennifer McCoy, Ph.D. Director, Americas Program

Governments have had a difficult time addressing the needs of the people, particularly low-income and marginalized peoples. As a result, satisfaction with democratic performance is eroding, even while support for the principles of democracy remains strong. High crime rates, poor public services, corruption, and chronic unemployment have made the promises of strongmen and populist candidates attractive to many voters. Learn more »

Blog | A Key to Democracy: Access to Information

In this Q&A, the Carter Center’s Laura Neuman, senior program associate, Americas Program, shares her insights. Access to information is one of the keys to democracy. Allowing people to seek and receive public documents serves as a critical tool for fighting corruption, enabling citizens to more fully participate in public life, making governments more efficient, encouraging investment, and helping persons exercise their fundamental human rights. Learn more »

Blog | Democracy and Dialogue: Venezuela Election Q&A

At the conclusion of the Carter Center’s work to help resolve Venezuela’s political crisis, Dr. Jennifer McCoy, director of the Center’s Americas Program, traveled to Caracas Feb. 24, 2005, to present the Center’s final report on the presidential referendum process. Before leaving, she and former Carter Center Caracas Representative Francisco Diez talked about the Center’s work there for the past two and a half years and the future of Venezuela. Learn more »

Carter Center Slideshow: Palestinian Elections 2005

A Palestinian woman places her vote inside the ballot box. Despite a boycott by Hamas and impediments to voters, the turnout was about 65 percent, and there was no serious violence either by the Palestinians or Israelis. Learn more »

Blog | Expert Q&A: Considering U.S. Elections in the Context of International Election Standards

A Q&A with Dr. David Carroll, interim director of the Democracy Program, and Dr. Jennifer McCoy, director of the Americas Program on the 2004 U.S. Elections. Learn more »

Stories From the Field: Jacob Lablah

Looking across the many rows of wood-and-mud shacks that house more than 12,000 people in a camp for displaced persons in Margibi County, Liberia, Jacob Lablah knows he still has work to do. Learn more »

Council for Ethical Business Practices: Strengthening International Guidelines Through Teamwork

Twenty-five years ago, then U.S. President Jimmy Carter signed the landmark U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act into law, making it illegal for American companies to bribe or pay excessive "fees" to conduct business in another country. Today, the Emory University-affiliated Carter Center continues his work through its Council for Ethical Business Practices. Learn more »

Jamaicans Renew Confidence in Democratic Process

Helping to break the cycle of violence that has plagued previous elections in Jamaica, The Carter Center in October observed the island nation's second relatively peaceful election. Learn more »

Blog | International Criminal Court Comes to Fruition

The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court came into force July 1, 2002, some 50 years after the United Nations first called for the establishment of a world tribunal. The Carter Center and former U.S. President Jimmy Carter have been strong advocates for the ICC. Learn more »

Blog | Dr. Jennifer McCoy Reflects on The Carter Center's Mission to Cuba

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter made history in May 2002 as the first United States president, former or sitting, to visit Cuba since Fidel Castro assumed power in 1959. Among those accompanying him on The Carter Center delegation was Dr. Jennifer McCoy (pictured at left with Cuban healthcare workers), director of the Americas Program at The Carter Center and associate professor of political science at Georgia State University. A special trip de-briefing with Dr. McCoy follows. Learn more »

Blog | Q&A with President Carter at the University of Havana

The following is an excerpt and translation from the Cuban Newspaper, Granma. President Carter’s comments are a direct transcription from a videotape of his speech to faculty and students at the University of Havana, Cuba, on May 14, 2002. Where President Carter’s comments were inaudible, a translation of the interpreter’s translation was substituted. Therefore, it is important to note that this re-translation may result in some variation from what President Carter actually said. Learn more »

Village Elections Project Begins in China

A Carter Center delegation traveled to China in June to help its government establish a data collection system for village elections and standardizing procedures nationwide. Their visit is the result of a landmark agreement signed by the People's Republic of China and the Center this spring. Learn more »

Donate Now

Sign Up For Email

Please sign up below for important news about the work of The Carter Center and special event invitations.

Please leave this field empty
Now, we invite you to Get Involved
Back To Top